Category Archives: Brain Health

Stimulant induced skin picking

Nutritional insufficiencies

Nutritional insufficiencies

Nutritional insufficiencies have adverse effect on your health and well-being

Nutritional insufficiencies: Stimulants

Did you know that stimulant use like crack, cocaine, and methamphetamine reduces appetite and leads to weight loss and nutritional insufficiencies? According to the experts from AWAREmed health center under the able leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury MD, Users of these drugs may stay up for days at a time. They may be dehydrated and have electrolyte imbalances during these episodes. Returning to a normal diet can be hard if a person has lost a lot of weight and memory problems may become permanent. All these are complications of long-term stimulant use. We are going to looking at some of these stimulants but in the meantime, you will need to schedule an appointment with doctor Akoury now to help you be free from all these addictive and life threatening elements like marijuana which can increase appetite which some long-term users experiencing weight related complications and need to cut back on fat, sugar, and total calories.

Nutritional insufficiencies: Nutrition and psychological aspects of substance abuse

When people feel better, they are less likely to start using alcohol and drugs again. Because balanced nutrition helps improve mood and health, it is important to encourage a healthy diet in people recovering from alcohol and other drug problems. However, people who have just given up an important source of pleasure may not be ready to make other drastic lifestyle changes. It is more important that people avoid returning to substance abuse than that they stick to a strict diet.

  • Stick to regular mealtimes
  • Eat a low-fat diet
  • Get more protein, complex carbohydrates, and dietary fiber
  • Vitamin and mineral supplements may be helpful during recovery (this may include B-complex, zinc, and vitamins A and C)

People with substance abuse are more likely to relapse when they have poor eating habits. This is why regular meals are so important. People who are addicted to drugs and alcohol often forget what it’s like to be hungry and instead think of this feeling as a drug craving. They should be encouraged to consider that they may be hungry when cravings become strong.

During recovery from substance abuse, dehydration is common. It is important to get enough fluids during and in between meals. Appetite usually returns during recovery. People in recovery are often more likely to overeat, particularly if they were taking stimulants. Eat healthy meals and snacks and avoid high-calorie foods with low nutrition (such as sweets), if possible. The following tips can help improve the odds of a lasting and healthy recovery:

  • Eat nutritious meals and snacks.
  • Get physical activity and enough rest.
  • Reduce caffeine and stop smoking, if possible.
  • Seek help from counselors or support groups on a regular basis.
  • Take vitamin and mineral supplements.

We have adequately seen that nutrition imbalances are a major factor in drug addiction recovery and we must make necessary efforts to ensure that we feed well at all times. However if you are already suffering directly from addiction, you will need to see specialist at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center and you will be professionally handled by a team of experts who will focus on Neuroendocrine Restoration (NER) to reinstate normality through realization of the oneness of Spirit, Mind, and Body, Unifying the threesome into ONE. This is the place to be for quick recovery.

Nutritional insufficiencies: Stimulants

 

 

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Cancerous disorders

Drug addiction subject

Drug addiction subject

Drug addiction subject and the brains health must be addressed objectively

Drug addiction subject and the brain: What happens to the brain when one takes drugs?

The dangers of drug addiction subject are significantly based on the chemicals they have that tap into the brain’s communication system and disrupt the way nerve cells normally send, receive, and process information. And according to the experts from AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under the able leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury MD, we have at least two ways that drugs cause this disruption it can either happen by:

  • Imitating the brain’s natural chemical messengers and
  • Over-stimulating the “reward circuit” of the brain

Drug addiction subject and the brain: Effects of substance on the brain

Some drugs (e.g., marijuana and heroin) have a similar structure to chemical messengers called neurotransmitters, which are naturally produced by the brain. This similarity allows the drugs to confuse the brain’s receptors and activate nerve cells to send abnormal messages.

Other drugs, such as cocaine or methamphetamine, can cause the nerve cells to release abnormally large amounts of natural neurotransmitters (mainly dopamine) or to prevent the normal recycling of these brain chemicals, which is needed to shut off the signaling between neurons. The result is a brain awash in dopamine, a neurotransmitter present in brain regions that control movement, emotion, motivation, and feelings of pleasure.

The overstimulation of this reward system, which normally responds to natural behaviors linked to survival (eating, spending time with loved ones, etc.), produces euphoric effects in response to psychoactive drugs. This reaction sets in motion a reinforcing pattern that “teaches” people to repeat the rewarding behavior of abusing drugs.

As a person continues to abuse drugs, the brain gets used to the irresistible surges in dopamine by producing less dopamine or by reducing the number of dopamine receptors in the reward circuit. The result is a lessening of dopamine’s impact on the reward circuit, which reduces the abuser’s ability to enjoy not only the drugs but also other events in life that previously brought pleasure. This decrease compels the addicted person to keep abusing drugs in an attempt to bring the dopamine function back to normal, but now larger amounts of the drug are required to achieve the same dopamine high an effect known as tolerance.

Long-term abuse causes changes in other brain chemical systems and circuits as well. Glutamate is a neurotransmitter that influences the reward circuit and the ability to learn. When the optimal concentration of glutamate is altered by drug abuse, the brain attempts to compensate, which can impair cognitive function. Brain imaging studies of drug-addicted individuals show changes in areas of the brain that are critical to judgment, decision making, learning and memory, and behavior control. Together, these changes can drive an abuser to seek out and take drugs compulsively despite adverse, even devastating consequences that are the nature of addiction. All these are not good for human health and that is why it is important that you seek expert’s opinion with the professionals from AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center today.

Drug addiction subject and the brain: What happens to the brain when one takes drugs?

 

 

 

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Addiction recovery challenges

Addiction exclusivity effects to the brain

Addiction exclusivity effects

Addiction exclusivity effects to the brain must be eliminated professionally

Addiction exclusivity effects to the brain: Why do some people become addicted while others don’t?

Looking at the drug addiction exclusivity and how it affects people’s lives, we can authoritatively say that no single factor can predict whether a person will become addicted to drugs. Doctor Dalal Akoury and her team of experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center agrees that the risks for addiction are influenced by a combination of factors which may include individual biology, social environment, and age or stage of development. The more risk factors an individual has, the greater the chance that taking drugs can lead to addiction. Like for example:

  • Biology – The genes that people are born with—in combination with environmental influences—account for about half of their addiction vulnerability. Additionally, gender, ethnicity, and the presence of other mental disorders may influence risk for drug abuse and addiction.
  • Environment – A person’s environment includes many different influences, from family and friends to socioeconomic status and quality of life in general. Factors such as peer pressure, physical and sexual abuse, stress, and quality of parenting can greatly influence the occurrence of drug abuse and the escalation to addiction in a person’s life.
  • Development – Genetic and environmental factors interact with critical developmental stages in a person’s life to affect addiction vulnerability. Although taking drugs at any age can lead to addiction, the earlier that drug use begins, the more likely it will progress to more serious abuse, which poses a special challenge to adolescents. Because areas in their brains that govern decision making, judgment, and self-control are still developing, adolescents may be especially prone to risk-taking behaviors, including trying drugs of abuse.

Addiction exclusivity effects to the brain: Prevention is the key

Drug addiction is a preventable disease. Research findings indicate that prevention programs involving social networks like families, schools, communities, and the media are effective in reducing drug abuse. Although many events and cultural factors affect drug abuse trends, when youths perceive drug abuse as harmful, they reduce their drug taking. Therefore it is important to bring in experts like Dr. Dalal Akoury who is also the founder of AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center where she is offering her exclusive NER Recovery Treatment to everyone including other physicians and health care professionals through training, clinical apprenticeships, webinars, and seminars. Finally, besides what we get from doctor Akoury the general public needs also to be educated and in this area a collective effort from Teachers, parents, medical and public health professionals will be essential in creating awareness that drug addiction can be prevented if one never abuses drugs.

Addiction exclusivity effects to the brain: Why do some people become addicted while others don’t?

 

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Tolerating drug misuse

Neurochemical reward elevation

Neurochemical reward elevation

Neurochemical reward elevation is triggered by substance abuse which has consequences in the brain functions

Neurochemical reward elevation: Addiction and the brain

With the neurochemical reward elevation, the user’s brain begins to associate the drug with an outsize neurochemical reward. Over time, this raises the amount of dopamine the brains think is normal. Like for instance, when a drug produce increases in dopamine in these limbic areas of the brain, then your brain is going to understand that signal as something that is very reinforcing, and will learn it very fast so that the next time you get exposed to that stimuli, your brain already has learned that reinforcing instantly. Over time, the consistently high levels of dopamine create plastic changes to the brain, desensitizing neurons so that they are less affected by it, and decreasing the number of receptors. That leads to the process of addiction, wherein a person loses control and is left with an intense drive to compulsively take the drug.

According to experts the reason why dopamine-producing drugs are so addictive is that they have the ability to constantly fill a need for more dopamine. So a person may take a hit of cocaine, snort it, it increases dopamine, takes a second, it increases dopamine, third, fourth, fifth, sixth. So there’s never that decrease that ultimately leads to the satiety. Addiction has to do with the brain’s expectations. An emerging idea is that drugs basically hijack the brain’s normal computational enjoyment and reward mechanisms.

For example, let’s say you’re happy about a great chocolate ice cream and over time you learn to expect that the chocolate ice cream is really great and you have no more dopamine released in expectation of that when you receive it. Nevertheless, if you take an addictive drug you can never learn to expect it because the drug itself will release an extra kick of dopamine. And when that happens, the value of that drug keeps increasing because now you’re learning that wow my expectations were violated, therefore this must be much more valuable than what I thought before. So what ends up happening is that dopamine system gets hijacked by these drugs.

It must be noted that there are other components to addiction like genetics and age of exposure which is why not everyone who takes drugs becomes an addict. Approximately 50% of the vulnerability of a person to become addicted is genetically determined, and research indicates that if a person is exposed to drugs in early adolescence they are much more likely to become addicted than if they were exposed to the same drugs as an adult.

Neurochemical reward elevation: Neurotransmitter dopamine

Doctor Dalal Akoury acknowledges that one of the key functions of the neurotransmitter dopamine is to create feelings of pleasure so that our brains associate with necessary physiological actions like eating and procreating. We are driven to perform these vital functions because our brains are conditioned to expect the dopamine rush. Addictive drugs flood the brain with dopamine and condition us to expect artificially high levels of the neurotransmitter. Over time, the user’s brain requires more dopamine than it can naturally produce, and it becomes dependent on the drug, which never actually satisfies the need it, has created.

Finally, AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under the able leadership of Doctor Akoury is a facility run by experts headed by doctor Akoury, for proper care and healing of whatever kind of addiction and whatever the level of addiction you need caring experts who will focus on Neuroendocrine Restoration (NER) to reinstate normality through realization of the oneness of Spirit, Mind, and Body, Unifying the threesome. This kind of treatment can only be found at AWAREmed. Reach out for help and get your life back with real professionals.

Neurochemical reward elevation: Addiction and the brain

 

 

 

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Alcohol poisoning threats

Alcohol addiction compulsive behaviors

Alcohol addiction compulsive behaviors

Alcohol addiction compulsive behaviors can be very dangerous

Alcohol addiction compulsive behaviors: Alcoholism

Alcohol addiction compulsive behaviors are facilitated by disorderly consumption. Alcohol intrudes into a person’s life with very negligible or no notice at all because normally consumers of this substance majorly take it for pleasure and then in its own will graduates to other unintended levels. Professionally doctor Dalal Akoury MD, President, and founder of AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center reiterates that it’s not always easy to see when your drinking has crossed the line from moderate or social use to problem drinking. But you can rest assured that if you consume alcohol to cope with difficulties or to avoid feeling bad, you’re in potentially dangerous territory. Alcoholism and alcohol abuse can sneak up on you, so it’s important to be aware of the warning signs and take steps to cut back if you recognize them. Understanding the problem is the first step to overcoming it and this is going to be our focal point in this article.

Alcohol addiction compulsive behaviors: Understanding alcoholism and alcohol abuse

Alcoholism and alcohol abuse are due to many interconnected factors, including genetics, how you were raised, your social environment, and your emotional health. Some racial groups, such as American Indians and Native Alaskans, are more at risk than others of developing alcohol addiction. People who have a family history of alcoholism or who associate closely with heavy drinkers are more likely to develop drinking problems. Those who suffer from mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, or bipolar disorder are also at risk because they are likely to use alcohol to self-medicate. With this understanding, the next question we need to ask is, how do you get to know if you have a drinking problem? Doctor Akoury is very emphatic that most of the drinking problem indicators come from the consumers themselves and the following are some of the observations you are like to come across under these circumstances:

  • Feel guilty or ashamed about your drinking.
  • Lie to others or hide your drinking habits.
  • Have friends or family members who are worried about your drinking.
  • Need to drink in order to relax or feel better.
  • “Black out” or forget what you did while you were drinking.
  • Regularly drinking more than you intended to.

Since drinking is so common in many cultures and the effects vary so widely from person to person, it’s not always easy to figure out where the line is between social drinking and problem drinking. The bottom line is how alcohol affects you. Meaning that if your drinking is causing problems in your life, you have a drinking problem which needs to be addressed professionally and that is where doctor Akoury and her team comes in. which the problem of alcoholism on your shoulder, you will be in danger of very many associated health complications. Scheduling an appointment with doctor Akoury now is the best you can do to have all these addressed timely and professionally.

Alcohol addiction compulsive behaviors: Alcoholism

 

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