Tag Archives: Stimatizing obese children

Reputable weight management

Older generation overweight and obese problem

Older generation overweight

Older generation overweight and obese problem are preventable

Older generation overweight and obese problem: Unlocking the truth

What gets into your mind at the mention of obesity? To whom do you think to rest the greater burden? Many questions can be asked, but the common denominator is that obesity is a health condition with us affecting everybody almost in equal measure. For instance, in the US the prevalence of obesity is skyrocketing in all age groups with the past few decades the number doubling. However, the focus of this article is going to be very specific in the number of older people being obese hence the topic “older generation overweight and obese problems”. Much as we want to focus on the older generation it should be made clear that not all older people are obese in fact the majority of older people are not obese and are living healthy lives.

Older generation overweight and obese problem: Prevalence of obesity among older adults

Looking at the available statistics, the prevalence of obesity in the US alone is over 15% of older people. Experts at AWAREmed health and wellness resource center under the able leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury, reiterates that, this number expected to grow significantly if measures to curb it is not addressed, this can only mean that as age catches with people so is the increase in the population likely to suffer from chronic conditions like diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, and hypertension because all these conditions are frequently accentuated by obesity. Therefore as a community, we must be knowledgeable to undertake necessary measures to avoid this by all means and that is why doctor Akoury created this facility to help each individual’s life through increasing awareness about health and wellness and by empowering individuals to find their own inner healing power. You too can be part of this great change by calling her on telephone number 843 213 1480 to schedule an appointment for the commencement of your weight loss program today.

Causes of obesity in older adults

Addressing the root cause of obesity in older people begins by determining body fat mass which is the connection between the intake and output of energy. The presence of obesity will be seen when one consumes more calories than their body systems can burn. Calories are essential for our lives however it is equally important that we keep desirable weight by controlling the quantity of energy we take in form of the foodstuff we eat with that energy we dispose of.

Various research has established that the quantity of food we take does not change as we approach our sunset days meaning that the decrease in energy used in old age contributes significantly to the increase in body fat in old age. Besides the hormonal changes occurring during old age may also build up fats since aging is associated with the decrease in growth hormone secretions, declining responsiveness to thyroid hormone, serum testosterone and resistance to leptin. Other factors that contribute to obesity include and we will discuss genetic and progress with the rest in the next article:

  • Genetic
  • Environmental and
  • Social factors

Genetic: Scientifically there is no clear connection between obesity and genetic. It has not been conclusively established any link between obesity and hereditary, however, following the observations made by health care providers, obesity in families may be persuasive to believing that obesity is related to the genes a person has inherited.

Older generation overweight and obese problem: Unlocking the truth

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Childhood weight gain

Cyberbullying and body weight

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying and body weight among children is not only subjecting them to several health risks, but also to social discrimination

Cyberbullying and body weight: Stigmatizing obese children

Up to now, very little research has been done about cyberbullying specifically toward obese children. Nonetheless, the high rates of youth who report witnessing and experiencing weight-based teasing could be a pointer of the magnitude of the problem many obese children are victims of cyberbullying. Devastating stories of two girls who hung themselves have recently circulated in the media. Megan a 13-year-old Missouri girl who struggled with her weight, experienced cyberbullying on MySpace and was called “fat” and “slut” by someone posing as another person. Celina, an 11-year-old Florida girl, experienced cyber-bullying via text messages from classmates who jeered at her weight and race. And like I had said, we all or our children the duty of care and so it is important to ensure that weight-based cyber-bullying is on the radar of parents.

Doctor Dalal Akoury MD, and founder of AWAREmed health and wellness resource center reiterates that parents can be powerful change-agents in bringing this issue to the attention of schools, and especially to help protect their own children from becoming victims of cyber-bullying. Parents can also communicate the following messages to their children to help prevent cyber-bullying, and to react appropriately if it occurs:

Prevention

  • Never share or post your private/personal information (name, address, phone number).
  • Do not share your passwords with anyone, not even friends.
  • When you see a picture, Email or message that may be hurtful, embarrassing or cruel, delete it do not forward it.

Reaction:

  • If you are the victim of cyberbullying, do not retaliate.
  • Record the message and details as best as you can.
  • Then, delete it, block the bully, sign-off or exit the Web site and tell an adult.

The facts
we have many opportunities for overweight youth to be cyber-bullied. Teens use the Internet and send/receive text messages significantly more than any other age group, with 93 percent using the Internet and 73 percent using social networking Web sites – most often Facebook and MySpace.

Three-fourths of teens own a cell phone, and on average, teens send/receive 2,539-4,050 texts per month. This is concerning given that the Internet and cell phones are the primary places where cyber-bullying occurs.

Cyberbullying and body weight: Strategies for parents

Monitoring Cyberbullies and victims spend more time on computers and report less monitoring than youth who are not involved in cyber-bullying. Regulate the time and access your child has to the Internet. Set boundaries on usage and the types of Web sites or services your child is allowed to visit.

Familiarizing Parents should try to understand cyber media and Internet safety. Share this information with your child to help them understand potential dangers.

Accountability Ask your child about Web sites, activities and communications they access. Set-up your own pages to understand these sites and keep your child accountable.

Communication – It is estimated nine out of 10 children do not tell their parents or an adult when something means or hurtful happens to them online. Some youth are afraid that they will lose their Internet or phone privileges, or that the bullying will get worse. To keep the dialogue open, make sure that your child knows that you are there to help.

Education – Work with schools to provide education about privacy and safety on the Web, or media literacy programs to teach youth how to be more intelligent, critical consumers of Web-based services and information. If your child has been a victim of cyber-bullying, seek for help at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under Doctor Akoury’s care becomes necessary and you can call her now to schedule an appointment.

Cyberbullying and body weight: Stigmatizing obese children

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Environmental toxic nature

Stigmatizing obese children lowers morale

Stigmatizing obese children

Stigmatizing obese children lowers morale and is quite immoral to do so

Stigmatizing obese children lowers morale: Parental obligations

In making effort to bringing up our children in the best way we can, we are often meet with different challenges hindering our desire to do our part perfectly as we would wish to. Take for example the problem of stigmatizing obese children. Is there any bad thing that can happen to a child than to be discriminated over? Doctor Dalal Akoury MD, President, and founder of AWAREmed health and wellness resource center is going to help us understand more about childhood obesity stigmatization. Childhood obesity is a health problem, but to stigmatize the obese children over their condition is very immoral and demeaning as it is destroying our children causing them to feel secluded, alone and helpless.

We have a duty as parents to find out if our children are being bullied in whichever way to help them maintain their self-esteem. In today’s society body weight is among the common reasons why young people are harassed and while this is taking place and our children are being bullied, victimization of overweight youth continues to be ignored by the media, research and policy discussions. Recent studies indicated that many students are being teased in a demeaning way or during the physical activity classes, they are called names, made fun of because of their overweight problem. I want to pose and ask if overweight a health condition like any other? Why bully? The consequences of weight-based teasing and bullying are many and can be severe. Overweight youth who are teased and bullied are vulnerable to social, psychological, emotional and physical health impairments including:

  • Increased risk of depression and anxiety
  • Negative body image
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Avoiding gym class
  • Skipping school
  • Academic impairment
  • Unhealthy weight control
  • Binge-eating behaviors
  • Reduced physical activity
  • Increased body mass index (BMI)

There is an emerging trend of weight related victimization much less known called cyber bullying causing a lot of devastating results among young people. Let’s take a moment to discuss cyber bullying.

Stigmatizing obese children lowers morale: Cyberbullying

This is the deliberate, attempt to inflict injury or discomfort of another person through electronic means. For adolescents, estimates of cyber victims range from 4-72 percent. Cyber-bullying takes a number of different forms including threats, insults, gossip, rumors, impersonation, hacking into other people’s accounts or spreading someone else’s private or personal information without consent. Peers are not the only perpetrators. In fact, youth report being bullied by adults and siblings, and 48 to 79 percent have been bullied by strangers or individuals they have never met in person.

Its anonymity sets cyber-bullying apart from more “traditional” victimization, but cyber-bullying is especially harmful because it penetrates beyond the school boundary and can possibly happen to anyone at any time. The majority (85 percent) of cyber-bullying happens at home, but these experiences may also affect children at school. What may be frustrating is that parents are largely unaware of their children’s roles as cyber-bullies or victims. Youth who are cyberbullied may be especially vulnerable to consequences that differ from more traditional forms of bullying. These include weapon carrying at school, low caregiver-adolescent connectedness, headaches, sleeping difficulties, sexual solicitation, social anxiety and suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Though it may be unclear if these problems are instigated or result from the cyber-bullying, the consequences remain the same and that is why you need to seek professional help from doctor Akoury now.

Stigmatizing obese children lowers morale: Parental obligations

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