abnormal-sexual
Clinically depressed

Clinically depressed due to cancer can cause you to do things that can cause you more risks than good

Clinically depressed due to cancer: Emotional health

The diagnosis of cancer is one that causes a lot of grieving. The changes that come with cancer disease can be life frustrating. It shutters dreams and plans of the victims and even their close relatives. But being clinically depressed may also come when an individual has been sad for a long time or is having trouble carrying out day-to-day activities. In fact, 1 in 4 people with cancer has clinical depression. The effects of clinical depression are alluded to great distress, impairs functioning, and might even make the person with cancer less able to follow their cancer treatment plan. Much as one is going to be depressed, all is not lost because something can still be done. Therefore, if you know of anyone who is clinically depressed, you can encourage them to get help from the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under the leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury MD. Clinically depressed people can be assisted in many ways including medicines, counseling, or both. With timely treatments, you can reduce your rate of suffering and improve the quality of your life.

Clinically depressed due to cancer: Symptoms of clinical depression

  • Loss of interest or pleasure in almost all activities most of the time
  • Being slowed down or restless and agitated almost every day, enough for others to notice
  • Frequent thoughts of death or suicide (not just fear of death), suicide plans or attempts
  • Continues sadness, hopeless, or “empty” mood for most of the day
  • Extreme tiredness (fatigue) or loss of energy
  • Trouble focusing thoughts, remembering, or making decisions
  • Feeling guilty, worthless, or helpless
  • Major weight loss (when not dieting) or weight gain
  • Trouble sleeping with early waking, sleeping too much, or not being able to sleep

Remember, some of these symptoms, such as weight changes, fatigue, or even forgetfulness can be caused by cancer and its treatment. However, when five or more of these symptoms happen consistently daily for 2 weeks or more or are severe enough to interfere with normal activities, it might be a sign of depression. If this description fits your situation, then you need to be checked for clinical depression by a qualified health or mental health professional. If the person tries to hurt him- or herself, or has a plan to do so, get help right away.

Clinically depressed due to cancer: What to do

  • Promote physical activity, especially mild exercise such as daily walks.
  • Reassure the person that with time and treatment, he or she will start to feel better – and although changes to the treatment plan are sometimes needed, it’s important to be patient.
  • Help make appointments for mental health treatment, if needed.
  • Provide transportation for treatment, if needed.
  • Remember that it’s OK to feel sad and grieve over the losses that cancer has brought to their lives, and to yours.
  • Realize that being pessimistic and thinking everything is hopeless are symptoms of depression and should get better with treatment.
  • Engage the person in conversation and activities they enjoy.
  • Encourage the depressed person to continue treatment until symptoms improve, or to talk to the doctor about different treatment if there’s no improvement after 2 or 3 weeks.

If you suspect you may be depressed, schedule an appointment with doctor Akoury today.

Clinically depressed due to cancer: Emotional health

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