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Good diet maintenances

Good diet maintenances skin health. Try it and find out for yourself

Good diet maintenances skin health: The blood sugar connection

Contrary to the past believes, currently research has established some correlations between diet and skin acne. We spoke to doctor Dalal Akoury MD President and founder of AWAREmed health and wellness resource center over this and she agrees that one of the best ways for improving the health of your skin is based on what you feed on. For a more glamorous kin complexion it is important that you eat good foods that target the stabilization of your blood sugar. Some foods make your blood sugar quickly soar. When this happens it triggers your body to make a burst of the hormone insulin to help your cells absorb the sugar. And that explains why good diet maintenances skin health efficiently.

Take for instance, if you’re eating cookies, granola bar, alongside drinking sweetened beverages regularly, you’re succeeding in pushing your blood sugar high rapidly. And the consequences of this is that you will have more insulin circulating in your bloodstream. Various research has suggested that insulin may play a role in acne. And while researchers were exploring the possible link, they studied some teenage boys and young men with acne for three months. During the study period some ate a diet including foods with a low glycemic load, and others ate a carbohydrate-heavy diet without being concerned about their glycemic index. Those who ate the special low glycemic load diet had more improvement in their acne.

On the other hand, a study published in a dermatology journal later that same year didn’t find any relationship between acne, insulin levels, and measurements of glycemic load. Meaning that, the matter is still under investigation. In the meantime, let us consider the following guidelines which can keep your blood sugar steady and at the same time fight inflammation and oxidative damage that could be linked to skin problems:

  • Focus on foods with a low glycemic index (GI), a measurement related to glycemic load. These cause smaller increases in your blood sugar, as opposed to the steeper jump from foods with a high glycemic index, or GI. Identifying low and high GI foods may take some time.
  • Eat small meals often. Eating every two and a half to three hours will help keep your blood sugar and insulin levels steadier.
  • Eat lots of vegetables. It is recommended that you eat 10 fist-sized servings of vegetables daily. Choose veggies across a range of deep and bright colors. These will provide a variety of antioxidants that dampen free-radical (or “oxidative”) damage and inflammation.

Good diet maintenances skin health: Gluten’s role

Finally, individuals struggling with celiac disease needs to avoid gluten (a kind of protein), found in certain grains. In these cases, eating gluten causes damage in the small intestine. Concern about gluten’s effects in people without celiac disease has become trendy in recent years. But people can be sensitive to gluten even if they don’t have celiac disease. In some cases, this gluten sensitivity can cause a skin rash. However, the rash related to gluten sensitivity, called dermatitis herpetiformis, is seen mainly in people with celiac disease. Therefore, a low-gluten diet can make a lot of nutritious foods such as whole-wheat bread disappears from your plate. These are important fact which we need to take seriously. You can seek for more professional input by scheduling an appointment with doctor Akoury now.

Good diet maintenances skin health: The blood sugar connection

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