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Colon cancer risk factors: History of inflammatory bowel disease

Colon cancer risk factors

Colon cancer risk factors are many and include being obese or overweight

Colon cancer risk factors become evident when polyps are detected during a colonoscopy irrespective of whether those polyps had been removed. When one is over the age of 50, it is advisable that careful consideration should be taken because the diagnosis is common at this age. According to the experts at AWAREmed health and wellness resource center under the leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury MD, factors that increase the risk of colon cancer are many may include:

  • Smoking. Cigarette smokers may have an increased risk of colon cancer.
  • Radiation therapy for cancer. When radiation therapy is directed at the abdomen to treat previous cancers, this may increase the risk of colon and rectal cancer.
  • Older age. The great majority of people diagnosed with colon cancer are older than 50. Colon cancer can occur in younger people, but it’s common with old age.
  • Obesity. Being obese increases the risk of colon cancer. Many patients with unhealthy weight have an increased death rate of colon cancer compared with people considered to have normal weight.
  • Low-fiber, high-fat diet. Colon cancer and rectal cancer may be associated with a diet low in fiber and high in fat and calories. Some studies have found an increased risk of colon cancer in people who eat diets high in red meat and processed meat.
  • Inherited syndromes that increase colon cancer risk. Genetic syndromes passed through generations of your family can increase the risk of colon cancer. Syndromes like familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.
  • Inflammatory intestinal conditions. Chronic inflammatory diseases of the colon like ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease can increase the risk of colon cancer.
  • The family history of colon cancer. One is more likely to develop colon cancer if a loved one had suffered the disease before. If more than one family member has colon cancer or rectal cancer, your risk becomes greater.
  • Diabetes. People with diabetes and insulin resistance have an increased risk of colon cancer.
  • Alcohol. Heavy use of alcohol increases your risk of colon cancer.
  • African-American race. African-Americans have a greater risk of colon cancer than people of other races.
  • A sedentary lifestyle. If you’re inactive, you’re more likely to develop colon cancer. Getting regular physical activity may reduce your risk of colon cancer.
  • A personal history of colorectal cancer or polyps. If you’ve already had colon cancer or adenomatous polyps, you have a greater risk of colon cancer in the future.

Colon cancer risk factors: Staging colon cancer

Immediately after being diagnosed with colon cancer, the next action point is to determine the level of cancer. This is essential for the determination of the appropriate treatment. This can be done using various tests like imaging procedures like abdominal, pelvic and chest CT scans. The stages of colon cancer are:

Stage I. at this level, cancer may have grown within the superficial lining (mucosa) of the colon or rectum but hasn’t spread beyond the colon wall or rectum.

Stage II. Here, cancer has grown into or through the wall of the colon or rectum but hasn’t spread to nearby lymph nodes.

Stage III. The cancer is now attacking the nearby lymph nodes but isn’t affecting other parts of your body yet.

Stage IV. Cancer has spread to distant sites, such as other organs like the liver or lung. Colon cancer spreading to this stage brings a painful experience to both the patient and loved ones. To help you go through this, you can call us at (843) 2131480 or contact Dr. Dalal Akoury on Facebook, LinkedIn and your pains will be addressed professionally.

Colon cancer risk factors: History of inflammatory bowel disease

 

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