Tag Archives: Central Nervous System

dopamine-5

Neurochemical roots of addiction

Neurochemical roots

Neurochemical roots of addiction needs to be identified and corrected

Neurochemical roots of addiction: The depleted GABA

For a long time, various forms of addictions have been taken to be just as a result of social problems and sometimes even decisions or choices we make in life. Yes, this may be true but we need to take a moment and look into this problem more critically to find facts about the neurochemical basis of addiction. Doctor Dalal Akoury MD, President, and founder of the AWAREmed health and wellness resource center says that it’s good that modern addiction medicine now recognizes that substance dependency of any kind is a disease process of the brain that features lowered dopamine and glutamate neurotransmitter levels. Importantly, as more legitimate research is done in this field of addiction medicine whose experimental basis is beginning to gain ground, models of neurochemical roots of addiction in the future may also feature lowered levels of GABA as the disease progresses. To understand this neurotransmitter (GABA) it will be necessary that we try to define some of the terms associated with it and appreciate the roles and functions of GABA in totality.

The use of GABA

Because of our unique DNA and the way that each of us metabolizes drugs, each of us may have different amounts of GABA in the brain but we are still considered to be operating “normally.” Unfortunately, there are no accepted medical tests to determine if we have too much or too little GABA activity. It appears that people who are nutritionally deficit and dehydrated often have problems with the operation of GABA in their brains. Since almost all of our patients are nutritionally deficient and dehydrated when they arrive at our facility, we have always implemented the addition of GABA to the IV therapy given to patients. The purpose is to provide a more natural boost to the GABA in the brain and to allow the calming effect of GABA to make the detoxification process more comfortable. Let us now understand how GABA operates by defining these terms.

Neurochemical roots of addiction: The neuron

  • A neuron is another name for a nerve cell.
  • Nerve cells float in the fluid.
  • Each neuron has an axon a thread-like part of the cell that sends signals from the cell body and a dendrite a part of the cell that receives signals from other neurons.
  • The neurons are not touching and the space between the cells is called the synapse.
  • Electrical signals are sent through the synapse to a receptor, a place on a cell that can produce a certain effect like the production of adrenaline if someone is frightened.

Neurochemical roots of addiction: The central nervous system (CNS)

  • The CNS is composed of the brain and the spinal cord.
  • The CNS transmits signals to the rest of the body using chemical messengers called neurotransmitters.
  • Neurotransmitters are stored in vesicles—hollow sac-like structures inside the cells.
  • These neurotransmitters carry a message from a neuron to receptors on another neuron.
  • The action of the neurotransmitters on the receptors has been likened to a key being inserted in a lock.
  • When the key is turned the lock opens and the neurotransmitters activate the receptors which in turn create an effect in the body.
  • Then many of the neurotransmitters return to the releasing vesicles to be used again.

Finally, you can always talk to us by calling doctor Akoury on telephone number 843 213 1480 to help you with any concerns you may have.

Neurochemical roots of addiction: The depleted GABA

 

 

 

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How-Drug-Addiction-Affects-Serotonin-And-Dopamine

Resilient stimulant and central nervous system

Resilient stimulant

Resilient stimulant and central nervous system

Resilient stimulant and central nervous system: Crack cocaine

Without missing the words, cocaine is a strong and resilient stimulant that raises the levels of dopamine. Doctor Dalal Akoury MD, President, and founder of AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center explains that this is a brain chemical which is associated with pleasure and movement, in the brain’s reward circuit. And since dopamine facilitates communication in some brain cell commonly known as neurons, which are released by neurons to respond to signals like the smell or taste of good food and then it is recycled back into the cell that releases it which in return will shut off the signal between neurons.

Cocaine prevents dopamine from being recycled, causing excessive amounts of dopamine to build up, amplifying the message, and ultimately disrupting normal communication. It is this excess of dopamine that is responsible for cocaine’s euphoric effects. With repeated use, cocaine can cause long-term changes in the brain’s reward system and in other brain systems as well, which may eventually lead to addiction.

Resilient stimulant and central nervous system: Health consequences

The negative effects of cocaine on human health cannot be disputed. From experience, doctor Akoury explains that among many other consequences, the following are outstanding:

  • Blood pressure
  • Cocaine compresses blood vessels
  • Dilates eye pupils
  • Heart rate
  • Increased body temperature

As a central nervous system stimulant, it can also cause headaches and gastrointestinal complications like abdominal pain and nausea. And because cocaine tends to decrease appetite, chronic users can become malnourished too.

Resilient stimulant and central nervous system: Effects concerning mode of administration

Even though the dangers remain the same, the modes of administering cocaine like smoking, snorting, and injection can produce different adverse effects including:

  • Regularly snorting cocaine, can lead to loss of the sense of smell, nose bleeding, problems with swallowing, hoarseness and a chronically runny nose.
  • Ingesting cocaine can cause severe bowel gangrene as a result of reduced blood flow.
  • Injecting cocaine can bring about severe allergic reactions and increased risk of contracting HIV and other blood-borne diseases.
  • Binge patterns of use may lead to irritability, restlessness, anxiety, and paranoia.
  • Cocaine abusers can suffer a temporary state of full-blown paranoid psychosis, in which they lose touch with reality and experience auditory hallucinations.

Finally, it may not matter how it is administered or the frequency use, users will still experience acute cardiovascular or cerebrovascular emergencies, like heart attack, stroke, which can cause sudden death. Most cocaine-related deaths are as result of cardiac arrest or seizure followed by respiratory arrest. All these can be brought to manageable levels if we all pool together and begin doing the right things. You may not know conclusively what to do and that is why doctor Akoury founded this health facility to help you stay healthy. You can schedule an appointment with doctor Akoury and together with her team of experts, they will professionally offer lasting solution to your individual conditions.

Resilient stimulant and central nervous system: Crack cocaine

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abnormal-sexual

Central nervous system depressants

Central nervous system

Central nervous system depressants can be very disruptive to the brains functions

Central nervous system depressants: What are depressant?

It is amazing how drugs abuse can accumulate so many names. And irrespective of the name used, their effects in human life still remain the same. We want to discuss the depressants which are also known as central nervous system depressant besides other street names like barbs, reds, red birds, pennies, stories, yellows, or yellow jackets, candy, downers, sleeping pills, or tracks, A-minus, or zombie pills. Central nervous system tranquilizers derail the normal activities of the brain and even that of the spinal cord say doctor Dalal Akoury MD, President, and founder of AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center which is a health facility founded with the sole objective of offering addiction solution to the suffering communities and the globe at large.

From her experience of over two decades in this profession, doctor Akoury agrees that medical doctors often prescribe depressants to people who are anxious or are just struggling to get quality sleep. This is a common practice and nothing is wrong with that. A depressant, when taken religiously as prescribed by the doctor, are beneficial to patients. However, when central nervous system depressants are abused or used wrongly, the consequences can be very severe. Doctor Akoury reiterates that when depressants are misused, dependence and addiction are inevitable risks. As individual users continue abusing these prescription drugs either by taking someone else medication or just taking your own inappropriately to get high, all the other chronic health conditions that are associated with drug addiction can easily attack such users.

As we continue exploring the effects of depressants, it is important to note that, these drugs can be divided into three primary groups: barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and sleep medications. Each of these groups will equally cause harm if not used appropriately. Careful attention needs to be taken in ensuring that the right prescription is used and the doctor’s instructions followed religiously. In the meantime, if for whatever reason you did not follow instructions well and you’re now suffering from its addiction, all is not lost. You can still get your life back if only you can schedule an appointment with doctor Akoury today for professional guidance.

Central nervous system depressants: How are depressant abused?

Depressants usually come either in pill or capsule form. They can be abused in different ways including some of the following:

  • Taking someone else’s prescription depressant medication.
  • Taking a depressant medication in total disregard of the doctor’s advice.
  • Experimenting with or taking depressants just for fun or to get high.
  • Taking a depressant while under the influence of other drugs.

Central nervous system depressants: How do depressants affect the brain?

Most depressants affect the brain by increasing the activity of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), a chemical in the brain that sends messages between cells. The increased GABA activity, in turn, slows down brain activity. This causes a relaxing effect that is helpful to people with anxiety or sleep problems. And like with other drugs, taking too much of GABA activity can be very harmful. Finally, you can avoid all these harmful effects by seeking help from the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center today and you will not regret having done so.

Central nervous system depressants: What are depressant?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dopamine Rush

Neurochemical foundation of addiction

Neurochemical foundation

Neurochemical foundation of addiction treatment solutions begins with diagnosis and tests for accuracy in treatment delivery

Neurochemical foundation of addiction: The exhausted GABA

In order to understand the neurochemical foundation of addiction, it is important that we first understand how GABA operates. And to do so, we are going to speaking to doctor Dalal Akoury MD, President, and founder of the AWAREmed health and wellness resource center. And her submission she brakes the understanding as follows.

  • The neurons
  • The central nervous system (CNS)
  • Inhibitory neurotransmitters
  • Excitatory neurotransmitters

Having discussed the first two previously, we are going to progress with the remaining as follows:

Neurochemical foundation of addiction: Inhibitory Neurotransmitters

  • Some neurotransmitters act like a brake on a car.
  • They inhibit or slow down the actions of the neurons.
  • These are called inhibitory neurotransmitters.
  • Other neurotransmitters act like an accelerator.
  • They increase the speed of the actions of the neurons. These are called excitatory neurotransmitters.
  • GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain.

Neurochemical foundation of addiction: Excitatory Neurotransmitters

  • Excitatory neurotransmitters are vital to:
    • Help us stay alert
    • Maintain our normal memory functions
    • Maintain our co-ordination
    • Maintain normal emotional responses
    • Maintain our heart rate
    • Maintain our blood pressure
  • Glutamate (a common amino acid) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain.

Which neurotransmitters are released?

  • If there is something that creates:
    • Anxiety
    • A feeling of panic
    • Other stress
  • Excitatory neurotransmitters are released and a person can feel:
    • Restlessness
    • Higher than normal irritability
    • Rapid heartbeats
    • High blood pressure
    • Insomnia
    • Even seizures.

The role of GABA in the brain

  • Glutamate speeds things up and when they are going too fast, GABA slows them back down.
  • If there is a problem with the GABA in our brains, the neurons fire more and more, increasing the speed of the processes in the brain?

Neurochemical foundation of addiction: How GABA works

When GABA binds to a nerve cell receptor, it opens the nerve cell so that chloride ions present in the brain are allowed to move into the nerve cell to slow the activity of the cell, and the person normally experiences a calming feeling. For example, if our brain produces more excitatory neurotransmitters like norepinephrine or epinephrine (adrenaline) than normal, we can become anxious or have more stress than normal. And when the brain is working normally, it will produce more GABA thereby slowing down the actions in the brain and thus have a calming and relaxing effect on us.

Finally, this article will go a long way in helping you do the right thing with your life. In doing so certain professional decisions will have to be made and to do this, seeking for the expert opinion will be necessary. And that is where doctor Dalal Akoury and her team of experts come in. the lever of professionalism at this facility (AWAREmed health center) speaks for itself since doctor Akoury’s practice focuses on personalized medicine through healthy lifestyle choices that deal with primary prevention and underlying causes instead of patching up symptoms. This is what you need and calling her on telephone number 843 213 1480 should be your starting point for the total life transformation.

Neurochemical foundation of addiction: The exhausted GABA

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neurotransmitters-and-mood-symptoms

Neurochemical basis of addiction

Neurochemical basis

Neurochemical basis of addiction and addiction treatment systems

Neurochemical basis of addiction: The depleted GABA

For a long time, various forms of addictions have been taken to be just as a result of social problems and sometimes even decisions or choices we make in life. Yes, this may be true but we need to take a moment and look into this problem more critically to find facts about the neurochemical basis of addiction. Doctor Dalal Akoury MD, President, and founder of the AWAREmed health and wellness resource center says that it’s good that modern addiction medicine now recognizes that substance dependency of any kind is a disease process of the brain that features lowered dopamine and glutamate neurotransmitter levels. Importantly, as more legitimate research is done in this field of addiction medicine whose experimental basis is beginning to gain ground, models of neurochemical bases of addiction in the future may also feature lowered levels of GABA as the disease progresses. To understand this neurotransmitter (GABA) it will be necessary that we try to define some of the terms associated with it and appreciate the roles and functions of GABA in totality.

The use of GABA

Because of our unique DNA and the way that each of us metabolizes drugs, each of us may have different amounts of GABA in the brain but we are still considered to be operating “normally.” Unfortunately, there are no accepted medical tests to determine if we have too much or too little GABA activity. It appears that people who are nutritionally deficit and dehydrated often have problems with the operation of GABA in their brains. Since almost all of our patients are nutritionally deficient and dehydrated when they arrive at our facility, we have always implemented the addition of GABA to the IV therapy given to patients. The purpose is to provide a more natural boost to the GABA in the brain and to allow the calming effect of GABA to make the detoxification process more comfortable. Let us now understand how GABA operates by defining these terms.

Neurochemical basis of addiction: The neuron

  • A neuron is another name for a nerve cell.
  • Nerve cells float in the fluid.
  • Each neuron has an axon a thread-like part of the cell that sends signals from the cell body and a dendrite a part of the cell that receives signals from other neurons.
  • The neurons are not touching and the space between the cells is called the synapse.
  • Electrical signals are sent through the synapse to a receptor, a place on a cell that can produce a certain effect like the production of adrenaline if someone is frightened.

Neurochemical basis of addiction: The central nervous system (CNS)

  • The CNS is composed of the brain and the spinal cord.
  • The CNS transmits signals to the rest of the body using chemical messengers called neurotransmitters.
  • Neurotransmitters are stored in vesicles—hollow sac-like structures inside the cells.
  • These neurotransmitters carry a message from a neuron to receptors on another neuron.
  • The action of the neurotransmitters on the receptors has been likened to a key being inserted in a lock.
  • When the key is turned the lock opens and the neurotransmitters activate the receptors which in turn create an effect in the body.
  • Then many of the neurotransmitters return to the releasing vesicles to be used again.

Finally, you can always talk to us by calling doctor Akoury on telephone number 843 213 1480 to help you with any concerns you may have.

Neurochemical basis of addiction: The depleted GABA

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