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Coronary heart problems and diabetes

Coronary heart problems

Coronary heart problems and diabetes are not just problems for the elderly

Coronary heart problems and diabetes: The known effects

Diabetes plays a major role in causing coronary heart problems. With this, diabetes patients are more likely to develop coronary heart disease than diabetes-free people. The relationship between diabetes and coronary heart problems is important for all patients. This will enable them to take the most appropriate action in keeping healthy. And just for further illustration, from the various studies, experts have established that established that diabetes causes high levels of glucose in the blood and when this happens, it impacts negatively on the walls of the arteries causing them to develop fatty deposits commonly known as atheroma. If this atheroma is allowed to build up in the coronary arteries (the arteries that supply oxygen-rich blood to your heart) the individual patient affected is likely to develop coronary heart disease which can eventually cause heart attack and angina says doctor Dalal Akoury MD and founder of AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center. Now let us try to understand diabetes better in the context of causing coronary heart disease.

Coronary heart problems and diabetes: Types of diabetes

We have two common types of diabetes namely: Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes happens when the body lacks the capacity to produce insulin. This type common with the children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body can’t produce enough insulin or the insulin doesn’t work properly. Type 2 diabetes is more common and tends to develop gradually as people get older usually after the age of 40. This type of diabetes is closely associated with being overweight, being physically inactive and having a family history of diabetes. Like most people in the south Asia origin and the African, the Caribbean are associated with higher rates of diabetes. Nonetheless, when diabetes is present, the most important thing is how to eliminate it and reduce the risk of other complications that come with it. Therefore you can effectively reduce your risk of developing diabetes by controlling your weight and doing regular physical activity.

The great news is that doing these things will also make you less likely to develop other cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart complications/disease and stroke as well as being great for your general mental and physical well-being. Whenever we mention engagement in physical activities many people do wonder how and whether they will achieve their set objectives. If this describes you then you need not worry for you are not alone. The most important thing to do is to resolve to take the first step of acknowledgment and willingness to lose. When this is done you can now seek for a more professional help from doctor Dalal Akoury MD who will take you through the best and natural weight loses exercises in the most professional way that will leave you much healthier. Remember that by losing weight and being active, you will be succeeding in solving several health complications as already mention.

Coronary heart problems and diabetes: The known effects

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Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease

Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease: Understanding the Effects of Diabetes

Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease

Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease. The many risks of heart diseases can and must be avoided. Health must come first

Diabetes is a serious factor in causing coronary heart diseases. If you have diabetes for instance, you are more likely to develop coronary heart disease than someone without diabetes. It is therefore very important that you understand the relationship between diabetes and coronary heart disease for you to be able to take the appropriate action in keeping healthy. Experts have established that diabetes causes high levels of glucose in the blood and when this happens, it impacts negatively on the walls of the arteries causing them to be more likely to develop fatty deposits commonly known as atheroma. If this atheroma is allowed to build up in the coronary arteries (the arteries that supply oxygen-rich blood to your heart) the individual affected is likely to develop coronary heart disease which can eventually cause heart attack and angina says doctor Dalal Akoury MD and founder of AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center. Now let us try to understand diabetes better in the context of causing coronary heart disease.

Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease: Types of diabetes

We have two common types of diabetes the type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes happens when the body lucks the capacity to produce insulin. This type of diabetes is very common with the children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body can’t produce enough insulin or the insulin doesn’t work properly. Type 2 diabetes is more common and tends to develop gradually as people get older usually after the age of 40. This type of diabetes is closely associated with being overweight, being physically inactive and having a family history of diabetes. Like most people in the south Asia origin and African Caribbean are associated with higher rates of diabetes. Nonetheless when diabetes is present, the most important thing is how to eliminate it and reduce the risk of other complications that come with it. Therefore you can effectively reduce your risk of developing diabetes by controlling your weight and doing regular physical activity.

The great news is that doing these things will also make you less likely to develop other cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease and stroke as well as being great for your general mental and physical wellbeing. Whenever we mention engagement in physical activities many people do wonder how and whether they will achieve their set objectives. If this describes you then you need ton to worry for you are not alone. The most important thing to do is to resolve to take the first step of acknowledgement and willingness to lose. When this is done doctor Dalal Akoury will take you through the best and natural weight lose exercises in the most professional way that will leave you much healthier. Remember that by losing weight and being active, you will be succeeding in solving several health complications as already mention.

Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease: How can I protect my heart if I already have diabetes?

If you have diabetes, it’s very important to make sure that you control your blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels to help reduce your risk of coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases. To do this you can chose to:

  • To more physical activity
  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet
  • Control your weight, and
  • Stop up smoking.

If you are diagnosed with diabetes, you may also need to take a cholesterol-lowering medicine such as statins to help protect your heart.

Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease: Family history

If you have a family history of cardiovascular disease, you have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease, angina, heart attack, heart failure and stroke. Ideally you will be considered to have a family history of cardiovascular disease if:

  • Your father or brother was under the age of 55 when they were diagnosed with cardiovascular disease or
  • Your mother or sister was under the age of 65 when they were diagnosed with cardiovascular disease.

Doctor Akoury says that if you have family history of cardiovascular disease, it will be very important that you consult with your doctor in good time for professional evaluation which may include checking on your blood pressure and cholesterol.

Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease: How does family history affect me?

Genes can pass on the risk of cardiovascular disease, and they can also be responsible for passing on other conditions such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels. There’s no single gene that increases your risk of getting heart disease. It’s likely that several genes are responsible. Lifestyle habits, such as smoking or poor diet passed on from one generation to the next can also increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease: Can I do anything about my family history?

This is very important but unfortunately there is nothing you can do about your family history. Having a family history of cardiovascular disease is sometimes called a ‘non-modifiable’ risk factor meaning that it’s a risk factor that you can’t change. However, whilst you can’t change your family’s background, you can choose your lifestyle.  So even if you have a family history, you can reduce your risk of getting cardiovascular disease by controlling other risk factors by:

  • Being physically active
  • Eating well
  • Keeping to a healthy weight and body shape
  • Not smoking
  • Managing high blood pressure
  • Managing high cholesterol, and
  • Controlling diabetes, if you have it.

Finally your risk of developing cardiovascular disease also depends on other things including your age. According to the several research findings, it has been established that the older you are, the more likely you are to develop cardiovascular disease. Therefore it is advisable that you be on top of everything when it comes to protecting your health. Talking to the experts is one way of being in the know. I would want to beseech you to call the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center and schedule for an appointment with doctor Dalal Akoury for a comprehensive review of your health and treatment where is applicable.

Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease: Understanding the Effects of Diabetes

 

 

 

 

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Diseases which are associated with obesity

Diseases which are associated with Obesity: They are Chronic in nature

Diseases which are associated with obesity

Diseases which are associated with obesity can be very chronic and prevention should be the best medicine for them

When we mention the conditions associated with weight gain people often think of being lazy or just being less concern with the good healthy nutrition. What many are not aware of is that there are several diseases which are associated with obesity and weight gain. In a series of different articles we are going to be discussing some of these chronic health conditions which we can easily put to control if we get the right information. To help us understand the clear picture or the magnitude of the conditions, we are going to be talking to the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under Doctor Akoury’s care. Therefore doctor Akoury is going to be responding to some of the concerns that we want to bring to you with a view of changing lives for the better. The following are just but a few of the diseases which are associated with obesity:

Diseases which are associated with obesity: Diabetes mellitus

This one such health conditions that is strongly associated with overweight and being obese. The most frustrating point with this condition is that is very difficult to treat and once affected, it can only be managed. Obesity is linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and this cut across both genders and irrespective of where you’re coming from. And in fact the relationship between obesity and diabetes is such intertwined that the connection has been nick named ‘diabesity’. The flow from obesity to diabetes is due to a progressive defect in insulin emission together with a steady rise in insulin resistance. The fact that insulin resistance and improper emission of insulin are happening very prematurely in obese individuals is worsening towards diabetes. An increase in overall fatness, preferentially of visceral as well as ectopic fat depots, is specifically associated with insulin resistance. The accumulation of intramyocellular lipids may be due to reduced lipid oxidation capacity. Therefore the ability to lose weight is related to the capacity to oxidize fat. Thus, a relative defect in fat oxidation capacity is responsible for energy economy and hampered weight loss.

Diseases which are associated with obesity: Hypertension

The relationship between obesity and hypertension has been investigated in a large number of cross-sectional population studies and a smaller number of prospective, observational studies. The results indicate that in most populations, blood pressure increases linearly with increasing relative body weight or body mass index. The relationship is present across all subgroups, although the magnitude of the association appears greater in whites than blacks and greater in younger than older persons. It is estimated that as much as one-third of all hypertension may be attributable to obesity in populations where hypertension and obesity are widely prevalent. Evidence from prospective studies and clinical trials suggests that hypertension in obese patients increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and that drug treatment of hypertension reduces the risk.

However, it is uncertain whether the risks associated with hypertension and the benefits of treatment are as great in obese hypertensives as they are in lean hypertensives. The effects of weight reduction on blood pressure have been investigated in a small number of randomized, controlled trials involving a total of about 600 participants. Overall, the results of the trials indicate that weight reduction lowers blood pressure over intervals of up to one year. The magnitude of the blood pressure response appears to be directly proportional to the amount of weight loss achieved. However, the latter is inversely related to the length of follow-up. Adequate maintenance of weight loss remains a major problem for the much-needed, long-term trials of the effects of weight reduction on blood pressure and the cardiovascular complications of hypertension.

Diseases which are associated with obesity: Heart disease

Obesity is reaching epidemic levels in most parts of the world but the greatest concern is the trail of destruction this condition is leaving on the complications of the heart. How does this happen? Doctor Akoury explains:

Diseases which are associated with obesity: Obesity Leads to Blockage in the Arteries

Let us start by explaining what insulin is, this is a hormone that helps the body metabolize blood sugar, or glucose. When one is obese the insulin resistance goes up causing the body to be less effective in digesting glucose. The result of this is high blood sugar which facilitates the formation of pre-diabetes or diabetes. As we had said above, this is a serious risk factor for heart disease. And due to the ineffectiveness of insulin operations in the liver, triglycerides (fats) increases in the blood causing the bad cholesterol, or LDL to go up and good cholesterol or HDL to come down.

Remember that cholesterol is a chemical which is very vital to a number of functions in the body. However, too much level of cholesterol in the body can be harmful. LDL transport cholesterol from the liver and intestines to various parts of the body. During this transportation process, if there we have excess cholesterol the excess will build up in the walls of arteries throughout the body, including those in the heart and brain. HDL takes cholesterol from the walls of the arteries and carries it back to the liver and intestines where it can be excreted. When there is too little HDL to carry away the excess LDL, it leads to atherosclerosis, which is hardening and narrowing of the arteries. This is a major risk factor for heart attack and stroke. Just to further on the relationship between obesity and heart diseases, obesity is also associated with increased risks of:

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Heart failure
  • Atrial fibrillation
Diseases which are associated with obesity: Coronary artery disease

Various studies have shown that an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in the overweight is real and realistic. This is because while studying some 300 000 adults for 7 years, it was established that about 9% increase in ischaemic-heart disease events for each unit change in BMI.46 moreover, obesity was associated with both fatty streaks and raised atherosclerotic lesions in the right coronary and left anterior descending coronary arteries specifically in young men. Nonetheless as for those individuals with pre-existing heart conditions the link between obesity and cardiovascular mortality is not very strong.

Diseases which are associated with obesity: Heart failure

Doctor Akoury explains that the relationship between obesity and heart failure is complex. According to the Framingham Study where some 6000 individuals with no heart failure records in the past but of age 55 were followed keenly for some14 years. Up on concluding the study, it was established that, the risk of developing heart failure was two-fold higher in obese individuals, in comparison with subjects with a normal body-mass index. On multivariate analysis adjusting for risk factors including hypertension, coronary artery disease and left ventricular hypertrophy, there was an excess risk of 5% in men and 7% in women for each 1 point increase in BMI. It was estimated that 11% of the cases of heart failure in men and 14% in women could be attributed to obesity alone. These complications can be very chronic and the sooner you tackle them the better. To help you get lasting solutions of all these, you will need to call doctor Akoury for an appointment to commence treatment.

Diseases which are associated with obesity – They are Chronic in nature

 

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