Tag Archives: Denial and alcohol abuse

Alcoholism

Irrational drinking effects

Irrational drinking effects

Irrational drinking effects are real and destructive to your health

Irrational drinking effects: Denial

When making reference to the real irrational drinking effects, many at times concentration is much on the physical health without looking at the social consequences attached to alcoholism and substance abuse. There are quite of very devastating social consequences which doctor Dalal Akoury MD, President, and founder of AWAREmed Health and Resource Center is going to share with us in this article. And as you continue unlocking your addiction problems and coming to terms with the realities of the dangers you’re putting yourself in, you can always start today by scheduling an appointment with the home of experts at AWAREmed Health Center for the commencement of your recovery process. Remember that early treatment is always preferred, however, if you have been in addiction for a long time, there is still hope and you can do the same now professionally with doctor Akoury. Now to the real compulsive drinking effects:

Irrational drinking effects: The effects of alcoholism and alcohol abuse on the people you love

Despite the potentially lethal damage that heavy drinking does to the body including cancer, heart problems, and liver disease the social consequences can be just as devastating. Alcoholics and alcohol abusers are much more likely to get divorced, have problems with domestic violence, struggle with unemployment, and live in poverty.

But even if you’re able to succeed at work or hold your marriage together, you can’t escape the effects that alcoholism and alcohol abuse has on your personal relationships. Drinking problems put an enormous strain on the people closest to you.

Often, family members and close friends feel obligated to cover for the person with the drinking problem. So they take on the burden of cleaning up your messes, lying for you, or working more to make ends meet. Pretending that nothing is wrong and hiding away all of their fears and resentments can take an enormous toll. Children are especially sensitive and can suffer long-lasting emotional trauma when a parent or caretaker is an alcoholic or heavy drinker.

Getting help for alcoholism or alcohol abuse

If you’re ready to admit you have a drinking problem, you’ve already taken the first step. It takes tremendous strength and courage to face alcohol abuse and alcoholism head on. Reaching out for support is the second step.

Whether you choose to go to rehab, rely on self-help programs, get therapy, or take a self-directed treatment approach, support is essential. Recovering from alcohol addiction is much easier when you have people you can lean on for encouragement, comfort, and guidance. Without support, it’s easy to fall back into old patterns when things get tough.

Your continued recovery depends on continuing mental health treatment, learning healthier coping strategies, and making better decisions when dealing with life’s challenges. In order to stay alcohol-free for the long term, you’ll also have to face the underlying problems that led to your alcoholism or alcohol abuse in the first place.

Those problems could be depression, an inability to manage stress, an unresolved trauma from your childhood, or any number of mental health issues. Such problems may become more prominent when you’re no longer using alcohol to cover them up. But you will be in a healthier position to finally address them and seek the help you need.

Irrational drinking effects: Denial

 

 

 

 

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Obsessive alcohol use and denial

Obsessive alcohol use

Obsessive alcohol use and denial has no place in good health

Obsessive alcohol use and denial: Myths about alcohol dependence

People fail in dealing with their addiction problems because of miss information from their suppliers and colleagues. Because of this, the obsessive alcohol use has been on the rise. As experts from AWAREmed Health center under the able leadership of its founder doctor Dalal Akoury MD, we want to highlight some of the myths that have contributed in rooting denial in the lives of addicts even when they are fully aware of the consequences involved.

I can stop drinking anytime I want toMaybe you can; more likely, you can’t. Either way, it’s just an excuse to keep drinking. The truth is, you don’t want to stop. Telling yourself you can quit makes you feel in control, despite all evidence to the contrary and no matter the damage it is doing.

My drinking is my problem. I’m the one it hurts, so no one has the right to tell me to stopIt’s true that the decision to quit drinking is up to you. But you are deceiving yourself if you think that your drinking hurts no one else but you. Alcoholism affects everyone around you—especially the people closest to you. Your problem is their problem.

I don’t drink every day, so I can’t be an alcoholic OR I only drink wine or beer, so I can’t be an alcoholic – Alcoholism is NOT defined by what you drink when you drink it, or even how much you drink. It’s the EFFECTS of your drinking that define a problem. If your drinking is causing problems in your home or work life, you have a drinking problem—whether you drink daily or only on the weekends, down shots of tequila or stick to wine, drink three bottles of beers a day or three bottles of whiskey.

I’m not an alcoholic because I have a job and I’m doing okay – You don’t have to be homeless and drinking out of a brown paper bag to be an alcoholic. Many alcoholics are able to hold down jobs, get through school, and provide for their families. Some are even able to excel. But just because you’re a high-functioning alcoholic doesn’t mean you’re not putting yourself or others in danger. Over time, the effects will catch up with you.

Drinking is not a “real” addiction like drug abuse – Alcohol is a drug, and alcoholism is every bit as damaging as drug addiction. Alcohol addiction causes changes in the body and brain, and long-term alcohol abuse can have devastating effects on your health, your career, and your relationships. Alcoholics go through physical withdrawal when they stop drinking, just like drug users do when they quit. All these and much more are just but hindrances which you can overcome by scheduling an appointment with doctor Dalal Akoury today for the commencement of your recovery process.

Obsessive alcohol use and denial: Effects of alcoholism and alcohol abuse

Finally, it is true that alcoholism and alcohol abuse can affect all aspects of your life. Long-term alcohol use can cause serious health complications, affecting virtually every organ in your body, including your brain. Problem drinking can also damage your emotional stability, finances, career, and your ability to build and sustain satisfying relationships. Alcoholism and alcohol abuse can also have an impact on your family, friends and the people you work with. We will be discussing this in details progressively in our next postings which you don’t want to miss. Stay with us on the link and learn with the best.

Obsessive alcohol use and denial: Myths about alcohol dependence

 

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Drinking problems and denial

Drinking problems

Drinking problems and denial are the Conner stone of destruction in addiction

Drinking problems and denial: Helping alcoholism victims get treatment

If you’re ready to admit your drinking problems, you’ve already taken the first step. It takes tremendous strength and courage to face alcohol abuse and alcoholism head on and that is why in most cases expert across the globe including those from AWAREmed health and wellness resource center under the able leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury agrees that helping alcoholism victims get treatment is often very difficult due to the problems relating to the addictiveness of the substance and denial. Reaching out for support is the second step. But one very important point is that it really doesn’t matter whether you choose to go to a rehab center, get help from self-help programs, get therapy, or take a self-directed treatment approach, support is essential. Doctor Akoury reiterates that recovering from alcohol addiction is much easier when you have people you can lean on for encouragement, comfort, and guidance. Without support, it’s easy to fall back into old patterns when things get tough.

Nonetheless, it is important noting that, your continued recovery depends on continuing mental health treatment, learning healthier coping strategies, and making better decisions when dealing with life’s challenges. In order to stay alcohol-free for the long term, you’ll also have to face the underlying problems that led to your alcoholism or alcohol abuse in the first place. Those problems could be depression, an inability to manage stress, an unresolved trauma from your childhood, or any number of mental health issues. Such problems may become more prominent when you’re no longer using alcohol to cover them up. But you will be in a healthier position to finally address them and seek the help you need.

Drinking problems and denial: Helping a loved struggling with alcoholism

If someone you love has a drinking problem, you may be struggling with a number of painful emotions, including shame, fear, anger, and self-blame. The problem may be so overwhelming that it seems easier to ignore it and pretend that nothing is wrong. But in the long run denying it will be more damaging to you, other family members, and the person with the drinking problem. So then what shouldn’t you do?

  • Don’t attempt to punish, threaten, bribe, or preach.
  • Don’t try to be a martyr. Avoid emotional appeals that may only increase feelings of guilt and the compulsion to drink or use other drugs.
  • Don’t cover up or make excuses for the alcoholic or problem drinker or shield them from the realistic consequences of their behavior.
  • Don’t take over their responsibilities, leaving them with no sense of importance or dignity.
  • Don’t hide or dump bottles, throw out drugs, or shelter them from situations where alcohol is present.
  • Don’t argue with the person when they are impaired.
  • Don’t try to drink along with the problem drinker.
  • Above all, don’t feel guilty or responsible for another’s behavior.

The above don’ts are just guidelines which many have failed to comply with and has made grievous mistakes in the process. And so that you stand out, I want to seek your indulgence, to be different by seeking professional assistance from AWAREmed health center and doctor Akoury and her team of experts will help you professionally.

Drinking problems and denial: Helping alcoholism victims get treatment

 

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