Tag Archives: hypothalamus and pituitary gland

brains and addiction

Hypothalamus brain area and drug addiction

Hypothalamus brain area

Hypothalamus brain area and drug addiction has nothing in common and must be avoided at all cost

Hypothalamus brain area and drug addiction: Stress management

Of the components of the brain, the hypothalamus brain area often bears the greater risk of attack by substance abuse. This is the part responsible for several functions including body temperature regulations, hunger, thirst, and sleep. Besides these functions, the hypothalamus also helps in the interpretation of how we respond to stress. According to the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under doctor Dalal Akoury MD President and founder of AWAREmed health and wellness resource center, it is almost impossible to talk about addiction without the mention of stress. Stress regulation is relevant to our understanding of addiction. And that is why we want to explore further into details the effects of addiction on the hypothalamus brain area alongside the regulation of stress and withdrawal.

When one is stressed up, the hypothalamus releases chemicals known as hormones which allow’ the brain and the body to respond to that stress. Unlike neurotransmitters (which are chemicals limited to the brain) hormones travel throughout the body via the blood system. It, therefore, means that hormones can exert an effect on other body systems as well. When these chemical hormones operate in the brain, we refer to them as neuromodulators. These hormones (neuromodulators) can act just like neurotransmitters in the brain. Like neurotransmitters, they have their own receptors associated with them.

Hypothalamus brain area and drug addiction: Stress the relapse trigger

It will interest you to note that stress is a relapse trigger to all users of drugs. It’s capable of prompting powerful cravings in addicted persons. I can, therefore, say with certainty that majority of us in one way or another have come across someone struggling with an addiction and tried quitting but ultimately relapsed when they became stressed out. Doctor Akoury says that under normal circumstances, at the beginning periods of recovery withdrawal symptoms often create stress and the vicious cycle continues. It is however very important to appreciate that stress will always prompt the addictive use, while efforts to discontinue use prompt stress.

During withdrawal, these stress hormones are elevated. Even though stress levels are high, the brain’s anti-stress neuromodulators appear to decrease, as do dopamine and serotonin in the nucleus accumbens. This suggests that withdrawal affected the reward system (evidenced by decreasing dopamine and serotonin). At the same time, withdrawal activates the stress and anxiety systems. This “1-2 punch” heightens the negative experience of withdrawal. This prompts people to seek relief via the addictive substance or activity (i.e., relapse).

In summary, the neurotransmitter pathways associated with the amygdala and the hypothalamus play a crucial role in sustaining the addiction process and this occurs through:

  • The negative emotional memory that is associated with drug withdrawal
  • The positive emotional memory that is associated with drug cues
  • The disruption that occurs to stress regulation
  • The pleasurable relief from withdrawal symptoms that occurs by resuming drug use or addictive activities

Finally, your good health depends heavily on how healthy your brain is. And that is why we recommend that from time to time, you should seek professional advice from experts so that corrective measures can be taken. Remember that this is in line with doctor Akoury’s profession and calling her now should be your starting point.

Hypothalamus brain area and drug addiction: Stress management

http://www.I-AM-I.com/wp-admin

 

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin
Obesity addiction

Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis

Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal

Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis a weight loss motivating factor

Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis: Upper body obesity

The HPA (Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal axis) axis is one of two major neuroendocrine systems associated with the stress response. Corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), secreted from the Para-ventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, stimulates the synthesis of adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary gland. Other hypothalamic ACTH secretagogues are arginine vasopressin and oxytocin, also produced in the PVN. Physical stressors such as hypoglycemia, hemorrhage, and immune stimuli activate PVN neurons expressing arginine vasopressin and CRH. ACTH stimulates cortisol production from the adrenal cortex. And according to the experts at AWAREmed health and wellness resource center under the leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury MD, There is clear evidence that cortisol levels may be related to obesity and metabolic disease and that is based on clinical observations of Cushing’s syndrome; the pathological hypercortisolemia in Cushing’s syndrome is associated with UBO, glucose intolerance [impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)], and hypertension. Adrenalectomy in Cushing’s syndrome patients reverses IGT and obesity. Research findings in the last decade has demonstrated that obesity and metabolic syndrome are characterized by chronic inflammation.

Fetal programming, stress, and obesity

Stress experienced in early life may also be a risk factor in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. A study on nonhuman primates reported that juvenile bonnet macaque monkeys exhibit greater weight, BMI, waist circumference, and insulin resistance if their mothers are exposed to food insecurity when the monkeys are young (age 3–5 months) further explaining why stress is a serious factor.

Sleep deprivation and obesity

In the past 30 years, the average nightly sleep duration has decreased from 8–9 to 7 h per night. Currently, 30% of all adults in the USA sleep less than 6 h per night. Sleep deprivation has been linked to both increased risk for obesity. Epidemiological studies have reported a negative association between BMI and sleep duration in adults and, children. Sleep deprivation is suggested to be a chronic stressor that may contribute to increased risk for obesity and metabolic diseases, possibly in part through HPA axis dysregulation, although the data are inconsistent. Sleep deprivation resulted in decreased night-time and morning plasma cortisol levels, or increased night-time plasma cortisol levels in other studies.

Finally, from the professional desk at AWAREmed health center, the current review provides basic support for the relationship between chronic stress, alterations in HPA activity, and obesity. Although animal models provide evidence of the association of stress, HPA axis, and metabolic diseases, human studies have proven to be more challenging, with more understated changes in the HPA axis. Therefore, for us to be safe from all these research findings, we have a duty to place both individually and collectively. And because of this, doctor Akoury established this health center to help in the transformation of people’s lives through increasing awareness about health and wellness and by empowering individuals to find their own inner healing power. Besides that, it will interest you to note that doctor Akoury’s practice focuses on personalized medicine through healthy lifestyle choices that deal with primary prevention and underlying causes instead of patching up symptoms making her the best for you and your loved ones. You can schedule an appointment with her on telephone number 843 213 1480 for the commencement of your recovery process.

Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis: Upper body obesity

http://www.integrativeaddictionconference.com/wp-admin

 

 

 

 

 

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin
Glutamate-Homeostasis-Hypothesis-Addiction

Addictive biochemistry and the HPA axis

Addictive biochemistry

Addictive biochemistry and the HPA axis that focuses on the real action points

Addictive biochemistry and the HPA axis: Ending alcohol abuse using alternative treatment

The door to addictive biochemistry opens when either the hypothalamus or one of the organs which serve the hypothalamus in accomplishing this job is injured, or if the nutrients required are not available. In any one of these conditions, the entire system will fall off the “point zero” (homeostasis) that the HPA system tries to maintain opening the door for addictive biochemistry. According to the experts at AWAREmed Health center under the leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury MD, we can’t change the fact that addictive biochemistry and full out alcoholism are associated with overexpression of the sympathetic nervous system; low serotonin, GABA, dopamine, endorphins and enkephalins and it is in the hypothalamus where the delicate job of balancing this network of hormones and neurotransmitters to achieve physical and mental health is supposed to be done whether it be directly from the hypothalamus or via the pituitary and adrenals under the control of the hypothalamus.

Differences between biochemistry and alcoholism

The only difference between addictive biochemistry and full out alcoholism is that addictive biochemistry becomes aggravated, meaning that the deficient condition within the hypothalamus, pituitary or adrenals is made more profound by the damaging effects of alcohol toxicity and the medicating effects which, while drinking, overexpress serotonin, endorphins and dopamine which magnifies the negative impact of an already up-regulated brain chemistry. The symptoms the problem drinker experiences intensify in direct relationship to the diminishing health of the neuroendocrine system which further encourages the person to drink more thus causing further damages. This cycle progressively intensifies until intervention which discontinues and heals the damage is required to stop it.

The pituitary gland is located below the hypothalamus and is directly connected to it via nerve and circulatory pathways. The hypothalamus regulates the function of the pituitary gland which in turn controls hormonal secretions of all other glands; however, specific to alcoholism we are concerned with the function of the adrenals and the secretion of cortisol which is under control of ACTH (adrenocorticotrophin) secreted by the pituitary, and epinephrine and norepinephrine which is also released by the adrenals due to a rise in CRH and/or signals from the sympathetic nervous system.  In the case of cortisol release, when the hypothalamus registers low blood sugar it will send CRH (corticotrophin releasing hormone) to the pituitary which then releases ACTH which will cause cortisol to be secreted from the adrenals.  This chain of events will also cause the release of epinephrine and to a lesser degree norepinephrine.  Prolonged increased levels of epinephrine will block insulin receptors which lead to insulin resistance and lowered serotonin, endorphin, enkephalin and GABA levels which impair HPA functions and increases compulsive/addictive behavior.

The adrenals sit on top of the kidneys and are directly controlled by the pituitary gland. The adrenals are comprised of two sections; one is the medulla which is the inner core and the second is the adrenal cortex which is the outer layer. The medulla relates to the sympathetic nervous system and produces the catecholamine’s epinephrine and norepinephrine. The adrenal cortex produces sex hormones, aldosterone, and what we’re most concerned with cortisol.

Although it is hard to imagine because they are docked on our kidneys, adrenal health is fundamental to our mental health. Proper levels of cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine are crucial to our mental well-being so the concentrated focus needs to be applied to their health when healing addictive biochemistry and alcoholism. As you consider breaking way from addictive biochemistry and alcoholism, you can always consult with doctor Dalal Akoury an expert in this discipline for over two decades and has been helping many get their life back globally by emphasizing on Neuroendocrine Restoration (NER) to reinstate normality through realization of the oneness of Spirit, Mind, and Body, Unifying the threesome into ONE.

Addictive biochemistry and the HPA axis: Ending alcohol abuse using alternative treatment

http://www.integrativeaddictionconference.com/wp-admin

 

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin
Misuse of alcohol

Ending alcohol abuse using alternative treatment

Ending alcohol abuse

Ending alcohol abuse using alternative treatment to avoid stocking more chemicals in the body system

Ending alcohol abuse using alternative treatment: The HPA Axis

Consumption of alcohol is a problem which has kept the global society thinking. There are two different schools of thoughts depending on the interest represented. The interest of health and that of generating revenue, and for the purpose of this article we will focus on the interest of health and the possible solutions that come with ending alcohol abuse. Several types of research have been done and conclusions made. One of the finds was that the “home” of alcoholism resides in the HPA (hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal) axis of the neuroendocrine system, to this effect scientists have developed extremely sophisticated tests which monitor the performance of this axis under various conditions by measuring:

  • Dopamine
  • Serotonin, GABA
  • Glutamate
  • Epinephrine (adrenaline)
  • Norepinephrine (noradrenaline)
  • Cortisol
  • DHEA

Professionally, doctor Dalal Akoury MD, President, and founder of AWAREmed Health Center reiterates that these are known neurotransmitters and two key hormones which define either the health of the neuroendocrine system or its state and depth of illness. To better understand the root of this phenomenon we will go into it a little more in detail regarding genetic addictive biochemistry and active addiction and how they affect the HPA axis. But in the meantime, you can direct all your alcoholism concerns to the experts at AWAREmed health for a timely treatment action.

Ending alcohol abuse using alternative treatment: The hypothalamus

The endocrine system is the network of glands in the body comprised of the hypothalamus, pituitary, pineal, adrenals, thyroid, parathyroid and the sex glands; ovaries and testes. These glands secrete hormones throughout the body to each and every organ via the blood which is received by their complimentary receptors. Hormones are “messengers” which carry messages coded by our DNA with the intention of keeping an organ regulated and healthy, essentially functioning as it should.  A hormone’s message will stimulate, suppress or maintain the functional cell or tissue activity of the organ it is received by.

The hypothalamus is the centerpiece of the endocrine system and is located in the middle of the base of the brain. The purpose of the hypothalamus is to establish and maintain homeostasis; balance within the body. It regulates all the functions of the autonomic system of breathing, heart rate, etc… but also hunger, thirst, sexual drive, sleep urination and metabolism which includes blood sugar control.

Although technically hypothalamus is part of the endocrine system it is really central to both the endocrine and nervous system; in fact, it is in the hypothalamus that these two extremely complex systems of the body intersect. As the Master Accountant, the hypothalamus performs checks and balances and responds to chemical messages of deficient or excess by sending various hormones and neurotransmitters to “adjust” to the requirements of your internal and/or external environments to maintain status quo. The hypothalamus is able to do this because it houses receptor sites for both hormones from the endocrine system and neurotransmitters from the nervous system and it utilizes the information it receives from those sites to do its job of not only controlling the entire endocrine system, including having a profound influence on the liver, heart, and kidneys, but establishing healthy brain chemistry and nervous system performance by correcting neurotransmitter imbalances by either slowing production of what is in excess, ingesting or degrading them faster, or in cases of deficiency, producing and releasing them as required.

Ending alcohol abuse using alternative treatment: The HPA Axis

https://www.awaremed.com/wp-admin

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin
sex addiction

Brain hypothalamus area and stress

Brain hypothalamus area

Brain hypothalamus area and stress. When the brain needs to be protected the most

Brain hypothalamus area and stress: Regulating stress and withdrawal

One of the areas of the brain that can easily be affected by effects of substance abuse is the brain hypothalamus area. This is the part of the brain that is responsible for several duties including controlling of the body temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep. Owing to these functions, the hypothalamus is equally playing a key role in how we respond to stress. According to the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center which is one of the leading pioneers in natural and holistic addiction treatment, we cannot effectively talk about addiction without the mention one stress. Doctor Dalal Akoury MD and also the founder of this facility agree that stress regulation is highly relevant to our understanding of addiction. And that is why we want to explore further into details the effects of addiction on the brain hypothalamus area even as we also look the stress regulation and withdrawal.

Because of that, it is important to note that when an individual experiences stress, the hypothalamus releases chemicals known as hormones. It is these hormones that allows’ the brain and the body to respond to that stress. Unlike neurotransmitters (which are chemicals limited to the brain) hormones travel throughout the body via the blood system. It therefore means that hormones can exert an effect on other body systems as well. When these chemical hormones operate in the brain, we refer to them as neuromodulators. These hormones (neuromodulators) can act just like neurotransmitters in the brain. Like neurotransmitters, they have their own receptors associated with them.

Brain hypothalamus area and stress: How stress motives relapse

From our studies, it is obvious that stress is a well-known relapse trigger to all users of drugs. It capable of prompt powerful cravings in addicted persons I can therefore say almost with certainty that majority of us in one way or another have come across someone who struggled with an addiction and tried to quitting but ultimately relapsed when they became stressed out. Doctor Akoury says that under normal circumstances, at the beginning periods of recovery withdrawal symptoms often create stress and the vicious cycle continues. It is however very important to appreciate that stress will always prompts the addictive use, while efforts to discontinue use prompt stress. During withdrawal, these stress hormones are elevated. Even though stress levels are high, the brain’s anti-stress neuromodulators appear to decrease, as do dopamine and serotonin in the nucleus accumbens. This suggests that withdrawal affected the reward system (evidenced by decreasing dopamine and serotonin). At the same time, withdrawal activates the stress and anxiety systems. This “1-2 punch” heightens the negative experience of withdrawal. This prompts people to seek relief via the addictive substance or activity (i.e., relapse).

In summary, the neurotransmitter pathways associated with the amygdala and the hypothalamus play a crucial role in sustaining the addiction process and this occurs thorough:

  • The negative emotional memory that is associated with drug withdrawal
  • The positive emotional memory that is associated with drug cues
  • The disruption that occurs to stress regulation
  • The pleasurable relief from withdrawal symptoms that occurs by resuming drug use or addictive activities

Finally, since we cannot talk about addiction without mentioning stress, it becomes important that the two need to be addressed professionally and that is where doctor Dalal Akoury and her team of experts from AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center comes in. if you are struggling with this, you can schedule for an appointment today with doctor Akoury for the commencement of your treatment.

Brain hypothalamus area and stress: Regulating stress and withdrawal

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin