Tag Archives: Neurotransmitters In The Brain

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Neurochemical rewards

Neurochemical rewards

Neurochemical rewards and drugs. This is a wrong combination

Neurochemical rewards and drugs: Addiction and the brain

Using addictive drugs floods the limbic brain with dopamine taking it up to as much as five or 10 times the normal level. With this elevation, the user’s brain begins to associate the drug with outsize neurochemical rewards. Over time, by artificially raising the amount of dopamine our brains think is normal, the drugs create a need that only they can meet. Like for instance, when a drug produce increases in dopamine in these limbic areas of the brain, then your brain is going to understand that signal as something that is very reinforcing, and will learn it very fast so that the next time you get exposed to that stimuli, your brain already has learned that reinforcing instantly. Over time, the consistently high levels of dopamine create plastic changes to the brain, desensitizing neurons so that they are less affected by it, and decreasing the number of receptors. That leads to the process of addiction, wherein a person loses control and is left with an intense drive to compulsively take the drug.

According to experts the reason why dopamine-producing drugs are so addictive is that they have the ability to constantly fill a need for more dopamine. So a person may take a hit of cocaine, snort it, it increases dopamine, takes a second, it increases dopamine, third, fourth, fifth, sixth. So there’s never that decrease that ultimately leads to the satiety. Addiction has to do with the brain’s expectations. An emerging idea is that drugs basically hijack the brain’s normal computational enjoyment and reward mechanisms.

For example, let’s say you’re happy about a great chocolate ice cream and over time you learn to expect that the chocolate ice cream is really great and you have no more dopamine released in expectation of that when you receive it. Nevertheless, if you take an addictive drug you can never learn to expect it because the drug itself will release an extra kick of dopamine. And when that happens, the value of that drug keeps increasing because now you’re learning that wow my expectations were violated, therefore this must be much more valuable than what I thought before. So what ends up happening is that dopamine system gets hijacked by these drugs.

It must be noted that there are other components to addiction like genetics and age of exposure which is why not everyone who takes drugs becomes an addict. Approximately 50% of the vulnerability of a person to become addicted is genetically determined, and research indicates that if a person is exposed to drugs in early adolescence they are much more likely to become addicted than if they were exposed to the same drugs as an adult.

Neurochemical rewards and drugs: Neurotransmitter dopamine

Doctor Dalal Akoury acknowledges that one of the key functions of the neurotransmitter dopamine is to create feelings of pleasure that our brains associate with necessary physiological actions like eating and procreating. We are driven to perform these vital functions because our brains are conditioned to expect the dopamine rush that accompanies them. Addictive drugs flood the brain with dopamine and condition us to expect artificially high levels of the neurotransmitter. Over time, the user’s brain requires more dopamine than it can naturally produce, and it becomes dependent on the drug, which never actually satisfies the need it, has created.

Finally, AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under the able leadership of Doctor Akoury is a facility run by experts headed by doctor Akoury, for proper care and healing of whatever kind of addiction and whatever the level of addiction you need caring experts who will focus on Neuroendocrine Restoration (NER) to reinstate normality through realization of the oneness of Spirit, Mind, and Body, Unifying the threesome. This kind of treatment can only be found at AWAREmed. Reach out for help and get your life back with real professionals.

Neurochemical reward and drugs: Addiction and the brain

 

 

 

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addiction

Brains explicit roles in fighting addiction

Brains explicit roles

Brains explicit roles in fighting addiction will only be effective when the brain is in good health

Brains explicit roles in fighting addiction: To fight addiction, feed your brains

The brain being the nerve center and engine of human life, its importance cannot be overlooked. Nothing will happen in the body without it being registered in or from the brain. The brain plays an integral function in effective communication to various parts of the body. Because of this, we have certain brains explicit roles including those that support the fight against substance abuse. Having said that, the next question is how possible is it and what do we know about the brain, addiction and effects of addiction to the brain? To help us get the answers, we sought the professional opinion of experts from AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under the able leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury (MD) and founder of the same. Doctor Akoury shares with us her personal experience with her clients over the years as follows.

Brains explicit roles in fighting addiction: Denial and denying the brain the essential fats

Denial is the biggest problem we face when dealing with addiction. This is evident in most patients who visit our facility and at one point I was attending to a client who for purposes of confidentiality I will refer to as Miss Agnes. Ideally if you met her, you might presume she had everything to live for. And just to share briefly, in her early thirties she was doing well as a junior executive who was married with two young children. Yet when Agnes opened up as she sat on my couch during a session, she narrated how her troubles at home and work had brought her, more than once, to put a killer knife at her wrist and imagine ending her emotional pain forever.

For over a decade Miss Agnes disorderly drank bottles of wine every night and regularly smoked marijuana alongside taking pain killers. Even though she knew her actions she denied it first to herself, her family and to me (her doctor) that substance abuse was a part of her problem. “I’m not an alcoholic,” she said with a lot of confidence. Because she was such a long way from even addressing her addictions, I inquired about what else she was ingesting and so I ask “What did you eat for breakfast?” That question revealed to me that she wasn’t just intoxicating her brain but she was also starving it of the essential nutrients. It was almost a routine for her skipping breakfast most days and when she took it will be only a cup of coffee or glass of juice once in a while. According to her, she put soy milk in her coffee because she thought that all dairy and meat products were unhealthy. She also avoided fat in all her foods because she believed fat would make her fat. What she didn’t know is, the brains rely on healthy fats for their functioning and for that reason two fats, EPA and DHA, are known for their mood-boosting qualities. By avoiding any fats she was literally avoiding foods that would provide her brain with these natural essentials and therapeutic molecules.

Doctor Akoury continues that realizing all these she asked her to go to a local lab for some blood test. We talked about her making some dietary changes, especially the merits of nutrient-rich brain foods, such as eggs and fish. She admitted in a guilty whisper, “I’ve been craving a hamburger” and you will agree with me that wasn’t really surprising. Like a good number of other women of reproductive age, there was great deficiency of iron in her blood further explaining what was lucking in her body to function well. With this deficiency she actually felt listless; she lacked the energy to cope with her demanding job and a family as well. Many are following the steps of Agnes and even as we continue with Agnes’s story, if you are in the same position, you can talk to doctor Akoury for professional advice today.

Brains explicit roles in fighting addiction: To fight addiction, feed your brains

 

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drug-abuse

Substance abuse movement in the brain

Substance abuse movement

Substance abuse movement in the brain can be very dangerous

Substance abuse movement in the brain: When the brain is under influence of drugs

It is because of a well-functioning brain that we can competently say that we are healthy. Any negative effect on the brain affects human health adversely. And in particular when substance abuse movement in the brain life become very unbearable. This is because the brain is the engine that drives the human body meaning that if the brain is healthy, it will process and transmit healthy information to various parts of the body. On the other hand, when the brain is contaminated all the processed information will be contaminated too. That is why we need to understand, protect and maintain the brain in perfect health if we want to get full optimum from it. The brain must be cared for it and kept safe from all the substance abuse flow which are likely to bring damage to it. Therefore, that is going to be our focus of discussion in this article and even in the subsequent posting.

Substance abuse movement in the brain: The brain’s adaptation to the environment

Remember that the brain is the most dynamic and complex organ in our bodies. I believe that you are interested in finding out how to care for this most vital organ of your body. Therefore it will do you good to keep on the link to find out more from the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under the able leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury. According to these experts, the proper functionality of the brain delivers quality assurance of our very survival. Doctor Akoury says that when our brains (the human brain) functions well, we are constantly adapting or adjusting to our environment (our surroundings) changes well. What many may not know is that this smooth adaptation is the work of our brain. And ironically, it is the brain’s ability to be so adaptive that contributes to the formation of all manner of addictions. From the various studies conducted by researchers across the globe, it has been established that addiction has a direct effect on the brain and that it causes changes in the brain in at least four fundamental ways:

  • Addiction causes changes to the brain’s natural balance (homeostasis).
  • Addiction alters brain chemistry.
  • Addiction changes the brain’s communication patterns.
  • Addiction causes changes to brain structures and their functioning.

The findings listed above will help us understand the importance of the brain and why we must protect it from the effects of drug addiction which has been sighted as one of the main course of damage to this very vital organ. Doctor Dalal Akoury and her team of experts from AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center are going to be very resourceful even as we discuss each of these fundamental changes that come with the effects of addiction to the brain progressively. You certainly don’t want to miss this and so we invite you to stay with us on the link and be enriched with this worthy health information. But in the meantime, if you are struggling with any kind of addiction, you may want to consult with doctor Akoury for a more professional undertaking today.

Substance abuse movement in the brain: When the brain is under influence of drugs

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drug-abuse

Substance abuse manipulations in the brain

Substance abuse manipulations

Substance abuse manipulations in the brain takes effect immediately traces of substances reached the brain

Substance abuse manipulations in the brain: The brain influence of drugs

Without perfection in the brain’s health, we cannot be sure of our health. The brain being the coordinator of all body functions must be protected from all the harms of substance abuse manipulations. With a well-functioning brain, we can competently say that we are healthy. Any negative effect on the brain affects human health adversely. This is because the brain is the engine that drives human body meaning that if the brain is healthy, it will process and transmit healthy information to various parts of the body. However, when the brain is contaminated, all the processed information will be contaminated too. That is why we need to understand, protect and maintain the brain in perfect health if we want to get full optimum from it. The brain must be cared for well and kept safe from all the substance abuse flow which are likely to bring damage to it.

Substance abuse manipulations in the brain: The brain’s adaptation to the environment

Because of the sensitivity of the brain functions, I am persuaded that you to find out how to protect it from any known harms. Therefore, it will do you good to keep on the link to find out more from the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under the able leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury. According to these experts, the proper functionality of the brain delivers quality assurance of our very survival. Doctor Akoury says that when the brains function well, we are constantly adapting or adjusting to our environment changes well. What many may not know is that this smooth adaptation is the work of our brain. And ironically, it is the brain’s ability to be so adaptive that contributes to the formation of all manner of addictions. From the various studies conducted by researchers across the globe, it has been established that addiction has a direct effect on the brain and that it causes changes in the brain in at least four fundamental ways:

  • Addiction causes changes to the brain’s natural balance (homeostasis).
  • Addiction alters brain chemistry.
  • Addiction changes the brain’s communication patterns.
  • Addiction causes changes to brain structures and their functioning.

The findings listed above will help us understand the importance of the brain and why we must protect it from the effects of drug addiction which has been sighted as one of the main course of damage to this very vital organ. Doctor Dalal Akoury and her team of experts from AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center are going to be very resourceful even as we discuss each of these fundamental changes that come with the effects of addiction to the brain progressively. You certainly don’t want to miss this and so we invite you to stay with us on the link and be enriched with this worthy health information. But in the meantime, if you are struggling with any kind of addiction, you may want to consult with doctor Akoury for a more professional undertaking today.

Substance abuse manipulations in the brain: The brain influence of drugs

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brains and addiction

Hypothalamus brain area and drug addiction

Hypothalamus brain area

Hypothalamus brain area and drug addiction has nothing in common and must be avoided at all cost

Hypothalamus brain area and drug addiction: Stress management

Of the components of the brain, the hypothalamus brain area often bears the greater risk of attack by substance abuse. This is the part responsible for several functions including body temperature regulations, hunger, thirst, and sleep. Besides these functions, the hypothalamus also helps in the interpretation of how we respond to stress. According to the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under doctor Dalal Akoury MD President and founder of AWAREmed health and wellness resource center, it is almost impossible to talk about addiction without the mention of stress. Stress regulation is relevant to our understanding of addiction. And that is why we want to explore further into details the effects of addiction on the hypothalamus brain area alongside the regulation of stress and withdrawal.

When one is stressed up, the hypothalamus releases chemicals known as hormones which allow’ the brain and the body to respond to that stress. Unlike neurotransmitters (which are chemicals limited to the brain) hormones travel throughout the body via the blood system. It, therefore, means that hormones can exert an effect on other body systems as well. When these chemical hormones operate in the brain, we refer to them as neuromodulators. These hormones (neuromodulators) can act just like neurotransmitters in the brain. Like neurotransmitters, they have their own receptors associated with them.

Hypothalamus brain area and drug addiction: Stress the relapse trigger

It will interest you to note that stress is a relapse trigger to all users of drugs. It’s capable of prompting powerful cravings in addicted persons. I can, therefore, say with certainty that majority of us in one way or another have come across someone struggling with an addiction and tried quitting but ultimately relapsed when they became stressed out. Doctor Akoury says that under normal circumstances, at the beginning periods of recovery withdrawal symptoms often create stress and the vicious cycle continues. It is however very important to appreciate that stress will always prompt the addictive use, while efforts to discontinue use prompt stress.

During withdrawal, these stress hormones are elevated. Even though stress levels are high, the brain’s anti-stress neuromodulators appear to decrease, as do dopamine and serotonin in the nucleus accumbens. This suggests that withdrawal affected the reward system (evidenced by decreasing dopamine and serotonin). At the same time, withdrawal activates the stress and anxiety systems. This “1-2 punch” heightens the negative experience of withdrawal. This prompts people to seek relief via the addictive substance or activity (i.e., relapse).

In summary, the neurotransmitter pathways associated with the amygdala and the hypothalamus play a crucial role in sustaining the addiction process and this occurs through:

  • The negative emotional memory that is associated with drug withdrawal
  • The positive emotional memory that is associated with drug cues
  • The disruption that occurs to stress regulation
  • The pleasurable relief from withdrawal symptoms that occurs by resuming drug use or addictive activities

Finally, your good health depends heavily on how healthy your brain is. And that is why we recommend that from time to time, you should seek professional advice from experts so that corrective measures can be taken. Remember that this is in line with doctor Akoury’s profession and calling her now should be your starting point.

Hypothalamus brain area and drug addiction: Stress management

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