Tag Archives: Opiate addiction

Fighting opioid addiction

Therapeutically supervised opiate detox

Therapeutically supervised opiate detox

Therapeutically supervised opiate detox is essential for real wellness

Therapeutically supervised opiate detox: Inpatient and outpatient

Opiate addiction is difficult to deal with because of the extreme physical withdrawal symptoms associated with it. Opiates or painkillers can be natural or synthetic. Drugs like heroin, Fentanyl, Hydrocodone, morphine, OxyContin, and opium are types of opiates. The dangers of using opiate are that when a person becomes physically addicted to an opiate they must constantly use that opiate repeatedly to avoid the experience of withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms begin slowly in the form of agitation, anxiety, running nose, sweating and yawning but eventually they become much more intense. The later stages of opiate withdrawal include extreme hot and cold sweats, nausea and vomiting, intense muscle cramping, diarrhea and acute insomnia. That is why medically and therapeutically supervised opiate detox is essential as a strategy of finding a permanent solution.

Opiate withdrawal is painful and can last for several long, agonizing days. It is often the fear of this painful withdrawal process that keeps most addicts to continue using opiates for many years past the point where they wish to stop. In amidst all these seeking for a lasting solution from the experts of addiction then becomes very necessary, and that is why the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under the able leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury are coming on board to help us understand some possible ways of lasting solutions. We have actually talked about treatment of addiction before and today we want to compare and contrast this by looking at inpatient versus outpatient medically supervised opiate detox as we progress into the discussion.

Therapeutically supervised opiate detox: Opiate withdrawal

According to the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center opiate withdrawal may not be lethal on its own unless the user is mixing together with other drugs while getting high or when they attempt to go through the withdrawal process all by themselves using medications and drugs on their own. Doctor Akoury is registering that the danger of opiate withdrawal is that it makes the addict feel like they want to die. It, therefore, means that in order to safely withdrawal a person from an opiate addiction, a medically supervised detox will be very necessary. This will involve using medication to take a patient from an opioid-dependent state to an opioid-free state under the care and direction of a medical professional with experience in conducting medical detoxification process. Ideally, medications used during a medically supervised detox protocol would be buprenorphine or Suboxone.

These drugs treat the withdrawal symptoms of opiate addiction. Additional medications such as Clonidine may be used to help stabilize blood pressure, and over the counter, drugs are often utilized to deal with the headaches, diarrhea, and nausea. There are two ways a person can receive a medically supervised opiate detox. It can either be done Inpatient or outpatient detox. These are fundamental medications options we have and we are going address them in detail in our next posting. In the meantime, you may want to consult with doctor Dalal Akoury about any concern you may have on this worthy topic and she will address them professionally.

Therapeutically supervised opiate detox: Inpatient and outpatient

 

 

 

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin
Nutrition benefits

Nutritional imbalances effects and diet

Nutritional imbalances effects

Nutritional imbalances effects and diet. The solution is in healthy feeding and being active physically

Nutritional imbalances effects and diet: Drug addiction recovery

The human body needs to be kept healthy for it to function optimally as required. Several things put together helps in ensuring the proper functionality of the body. Among them is the good nutrition, we all need to feed well for our bodies to have enough energy to propel daily life activities. When we feed well and avoid harmful substance like drugs into our system the body will function normally, however, the deficiency of these vital nutrients in the body may have serious consequences especially in the life of those using drugs. It, therefore, means that nutritional imbalances effects on such people if not addressed in good time can cause serious health complications, and that is why we want to engage the services of doctor Dalal Akoury MD, President, and founder of the AWAREmed health center to help you and me live a healthy lifestyle.

Nutritional imbalances effects and diet: How substance abuse harms the body

Substance abuse harms the body in two major ways which need to be properly identified and addressed adequately, the two ways include:

  • The substance itself affects the body
  • It causes negative lifestyle changes, such as irregular eating and poor diet

For example, infants who were exposed to alcohol while in the womb often have physical and mental problems. The alcohol affects the growing baby by crossing the placenta. After birth, the baby may have withdrawal symptoms. The mother’s poor nutrition, while she is drinking, can harm the baby’s growth and development while still in the womb.

Recovery from substance abuse also affects the body in other ways, including metabolism processing energy, organ function, and mental well-being. Proper nutrition may help the healing process. Nutrients supply the body with energy. They provide substances to build and maintain healthy organs and fight off infection. The impact of different drugs on nutrition is described below.

Nutritional imbalances effects and diet: Opiates

Opiates including codeine, oxycontin, heroin, and morphine affect the gastrointestinal system. Constipation is a very common symptom of abuse. Symptoms that are common during withdrawal include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

These symptoms may lead to a lack of enough nutrients and an imbalance of electrolytes such as sodium, potassium, and chloride.

Eating balanced meals may make these symptoms less severe however eating can be difficult due to nausea. A high-fiber diet with plenty of complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, vegetables, peas, and beans is recommended.

Nutritional imbalances effects and diet: Alcohol

Alcoholism is one of the major causes of nutritional deficiency in the United States. The most common deficiencies are of pyridoxine (vitamin B6), thiamine, and folic acid. A lack of these nutrients causes anemia and nervous system neurologic problems. Korsakoff’s syndrome “wet brain” occurs when heavy alcohol use causes a lack of enough thiamine.

Alcohol intoxication also damages two major organs involved in metabolism and nutrition: the liver and the pancreas. The liver removes toxins from harmful substances. The pancreas regulates blood sugar and the absorption of fat. Damage to these two organs results in an imbalance of fluids, calories, protein, and electrolytes.

Other complications include:

  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Permanent liver damage (or cirrhosis)
  • Seizures
  • Severe malnutrition
  • Shortened life expectancy

Laboratory tests for protein, iron, and electrolytes may be needed to determine if there is a liver disease in addition to the alcohol problem. Women who drink heavily are at high risk of osteoporosis and need to take calcium supplements and also if this describes you, it is important that you be consulting with experts from time to time and AWAREmed health center is your home of all addiction solutions.

Nutritional imbalances effects and diet: Drug addiction recovery

http://www.integrativeaddictionconference.com/wp-admin

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin
outpatient-treatment

Medically supervised opiate detox

Medically supervised opiate

Medically supervised opiate detox and natural detox options for body cleansing are primarily done to pave way for the real treatment

Medically supervised opiate detox: Inpatient versus outpatient

Opiate addiction is a difficult addiction to deal with normally because of the extreme physical withdrawal symptoms associated with this type of drug addiction. Opiates or painkillers as they are commonly known can be natural or synthetic. Drugs like heroin, Fentanyl, hydrocodone, morphine, OxyContin and opium are types of opiates. The dangers of using opiate are that when a person becomes physically addicted to an opiate they must constantly use that opiate repeatedly to avoid the experience of withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms begin slowly in the form of agitation, anxiety, running nose, sweating and yawning but eventually they become much more intense. The later stages of opiate withdrawal include extreme hot and cold sweats, nausea and vomiting, intense muscle cramping, diarrhea and acute insomnia. That is why medically supervised opiate detox is very essential as a strategy of finding permanent solution.

Opiate withdrawal is painful and can last for several long, agonizing days. It is often the fear of this painful withdrawal process that keeps most addicts to continue using opiates for many years past the point where they wish to stop. In amidst all these seeking for lasting solution from the experts of addiction then becomes very necessary, and that is why the experts from AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under the able leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury are coming on board to help us understand some possible ways of lasting solutions. We have actually talked about treatment of addiction before and today we want to compare and contrast this by looking at inpatient versus outpatient medically supervised opiate detox as we progress into the discussion.

Medically supervised opiate detox: Opiate withdrawal

According to the experts at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center opiate withdrawal may not be lethal on its own unless the user is mixing together with other drugs while getting high or when they attempt to go through the withdrawal process all by themselves using medications and drugs on their own. Doctor Akoury is registering that the danger of opiate withdrawal is that it makes the addict feel like they want to die. It therefore means that in order to safely withdrawal a person from an opiate addiction, a medically supervised detox will be very necessary. This will involve using medication to take a patient from an opioid-dependent state to an opioid-free state under the care and direction of a medical professional with experience in conducting medical detoxification process. Ideally medications used during a medically supervised detox protocol would be buprenorphine or Suboxone.

These drugs treat the withdrawal symptoms of opiate addiction. Additional medications such as Clonidine may be used to help stabilize blood pressure, and over the counter drugs are often utilized to deal with the headaches, diarrhea and nausea. There are two ways a person can receive a medically supervised opiate detox. It can either be done Inpatient or outpatient detox. These are fundamental medications options we have and we are going address them in detail in our next posting. In the meantime, you may want to consult with doctor Dalal Akoury about any concern you may have in this worthy topic and she will address them professionally.

Medically supervised opiate detox: Inpatient versus outpatient

http://www.I-AM-I.com/wp-admin

 

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin
Alcohol and work

Remaining sober by ensuring healthy eating habits

Remaining sober

Remaining sober by ensuring healthy eating habits will help you escape instances of black out

Remaining sober by ensuring healthy eating habits: Nutrition and recovery

Did you know that the food you eat could either help you out of your addiction situation? On the other hand the same food can also make you to sink further into addiction. These are two conflicting statements yet they are pregnant with a lot of truth in them. If you are wondering how, then you are just right in time for the commencement of this healthy discussion whose main focus is based on remaining sober by ensuring healthy eating habits. Now to begin with, there is the general concern that the escalation of substance abuse is ruining the young, the old and even the unborn children. This is not something to be taken lightly because lives are being lost, manpower in our work stations is reducing and the cost of maintaining the victims in the rehabilitations centers is chocking the economies of our states down to the local villages and to the smallest unit of our families. Doctor Akoury a veteran addiction expert is not left out in this matter and she is saying that as things stand right now, there is mounting evidence which suggests that some of these sweet and appealing food stuff may be the reason why we are ever struggling with all manner of addictions. If this is the prevailing circumstance, the question that begs for an answer is what is the best solution to the problem? This is the one million questions that we want to respond to in this discussion.

Remaining sober by ensuring healthy eating habits: The nutritional double whammy

From the professional point of view, the nutritional dilemma faced by recovering addicts is coming in two different categories. The first one being the very act of ingesting drugs or alcohol which is no doubt wreaking havoc on the body of users. Like for instance alcohol is one of the greatest impediments to nutrient breakdown and assimilation resulting in nutritional deficiencies. Opiates on the other hand tend to cause gastrointestinal issues, and more so during opiate withdrawal, severe vomiting and diarrhea can lead to nutrient depletion while stimulants will be suppressing appetite which can ultimately lead to an insufficient intake of calories and nutrients.

In addition to the purely physiological implications of drug and alcohol abuse, there is another factor that results in a less than stellar nutritional report card for addicts and that is change in lifestyle. Professionally doctor Akoury reports that when a person is lost in an addiction, he/she is less likely to eat in a very unhealthy manner. This is so because some of these drugs will cause you to eat too much while on the other hand the others will do the opposite thereby causing you to eat too little. At the height of their drinking, alcoholics often derive as much as 50 percent of their daily calorie allowance from alcohol itself.  In most cases, the need for the addictive substance is prioritized over the need for, say, a whole-grain turkey sandwich or other high-quality nutrient-dense food says doctor Akoury. If this trend is allowed to continue, danger awaits us ahead and that it why remaining sober is a priority. You may not know how, but that is why you need to call doctor Dalal Akoury today for a much more professional direction.

Remaining sober by ensuring healthy eating habits: Nutrition and recovery

http://www.awaremednetwork.com/

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin
Addiction

Disturbing heroin addiction realities

Disturbing heroin addiction

Disturbing heroin addiction realities requires all of us embrace healthy lifestyle for the whole family

Disturbing heroin addiction realities: Understanding the drug as it is

Having discussed the question how do I know if I have a heroin problem in the previous article, we want to take time and discuss the remaining three in this article to appreciate the effects of heroin addiction and treatment. Again we are going to be relying on the expert opinions from AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under the able leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury’s care. Dr. Akoury is also the founder of the facility and has been in the medical practice for well over two decades making her to be one of the most experienced medical doctors when it comes to drug addiction and other areas of concern.

 

  1. How Do I Know if I Have a Heroin Problem?
  2. What is Heroin and how is it Used?
  3. Effects of Heroin Use
  4. Treatment for Heroin and Opiate Addiction

What is heroin and how is it used?

Heroin is an illegal, semi-synthetic drug processed from morphine, a substance extracted from the opium poppy. It is used as a recreational drug for the intense feelings of relaxation and euphoria it induces. Heroin is typically sold as a white or brownish powder or as a black, sticky substance known as “black tar heroin.” Most street heroin is “cut” with other drugs or with substances such as sugar or starch. Heroin can also be cut with poisons like strychnine.

Heroin is usually dissolved and injected, or the powder is snorted or smoked. All forms of heroin are psychologically and physically addictive, and a tolerance to the drug builds quickly. IV or intramuscular heroin use poses special problems because of the potential for transmitting infectious diseases. Over the past decade, researchers have observed a shift in heroin use patterns, from injection to snorting and smoking. With this shift comes an even more diverse group of users.

Disturbing heroin addiction realities: Effects of heroin use

Short-Term Effects: Soon after administration, heroin crosses the blood-brain barrier. Users report feelings a surge of intense pleasure (a “rush”). This is usually accompanied by a warm flushing of the skin, dry mouth, and a heavy feeling in the extremities. Nausea, vomiting, and severe itching may also occur. After the initial effects, the heroin user will typically be drowsy for several hours. Mental function is clouded by heroin’s effect on the central nervous system. Cardiac function slows. Breathing also slows sometimes to the point of death. The following are some of the short term heroin effects:

  • Euphoria
  • Depressed respiration
  • Flushed skin
  • Clouded mental functioning/sedation
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Suppression of pain
  • Infectious diseases

Long-Term Effects: One of the most harmful long-term effects of heroin abuse is addiction itself. Addiction is a chronic disease, characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use despite negative consequences, and by changes in the brain. Heroin also produces profound degrees of tolerance and physical dependence, which contributes heavily to abuse. Painful withdrawal symptoms occur if use is reduced abruptly. The following are some of the long term effects of heroin:

  • Addiction
  • Problems with the heart, liver and kidneys
  • Overdose Risk
  • Infectious diseases, for example, HIV/AIDS and hepatitis
  • Collapsed veins
  • Abscesses (at injection sites)
  • Arthritis and other rheumatological problems
  • Infection of heart lining and valves
  • Depressed lung function

We will be discussing the last bit of treatment in the next posting and you don’t want to miss that. In the meantime, you can schedule for an appointment with doctor Akoury should you have any concern about this discussion or any relating to any kind of addiction.

Disturbing heroin addiction realities: Understanding the drug as it is

 

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin