Tag Archives: Stigma

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Discriminating obese and overweight people

Discriminating obese

Discriminating obese and overweight people is wrong and we must join forces to stop it

Discriminating obese and overweight people: How it affect both men and women

It is regrettable that at this point of time people are still living under certain siege of discrimination because of some health conditions that could be avoided like weight gain and obesity. Discriminating obese and overweight people a serious illegality which is very common the world over with the US taking the lead. I will be discussing some of the effects of this uncalled for habit and offer you solutions so that you can live your life freely and void of any discrimination. According to the experts from AWAREmed health and wellness resource center under the leadership of doctor Dalal Akoury MD, people who are affected by excess weight or obesity experience discrimination across a wide variety of settings, including healthcare, employment, schools, public transport sector, social amenities joints and interpersonal relationships.

Discriminating obese and overweight people: Social discrimination

Let us consider the employment settings, job seekers who are affected by excess weight are often less likely to secure job opportunities or even be recommended for promotion compared to their slimmer colleagues and in the very extreme they are also faced with lower remunerations and increased risk of job insecurity based on their weight alone.

In healthcare settings, obese patients often experience prejudice, apathy and lower quality of care from medical professionals, which may result in patients choosing to delay or forgo crucial preventative care to avoid additional humiliation.

Students also face weight-based victimization in educational sector from their peers, teachers and even parents, which may interfere with social support and educational achievement.

Weight stigma is even present in interpersonal relationships with friends, family and romantic partners, such that negative judgment invades almost all areas of the lives of people affected by obesity.

Discriminating obese and overweight people: Gender differences in weight gain stigma

Although both men and women are vulnerable to weight discrimination, their experiences may differ with respect to how much discrimination they are exposed to and the forms that it takes. Most notably, women seem to experience higher levels of weight stigmatization than men, even at lower levels of excess weight. Research suggests that women, especially those who are middle aged or with lower levels of education, experience weight discrimination at significantly higher rates than male peers. Moreover, women report weight discrimination at lower levels of excess weight than men. For example, men tend to report considerable stigmatization at a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 35 or higher, whereas women report experiencing notable increases in weight discrimination at a lower BMI of only 27.

North American ideals of physical attractiveness, which emphasize thinness as central to feminine beauty, may account for some of these differences. Women whose bodies deviate, even slightly, from physical beauty standards may be vulnerable to weight stigmatization. Given that thinness ideals have become deeply ingrained into our society and are heavily promoted by the mass media, diet industry and fashion industry, it’s not surprising to see widespread weight stigmatization toward women, even if they are not “obese.” For women, weight discrimination has been associated with poorer body image, low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and a range of unhealthy eating behaviors, including binge eating. We must get out of this madness and scheduling an appointment with AWAREmed health center should be the starting point to getting a leaner body weight.

Discriminating obese and overweight people: How it affect both men and women

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Women alcohol addiction and social stigma

Women alcohol addiction

Women alcohol addiction and social stigma eradication

Women alcohol addiction and social stigma: The consequences of alcohol abuse

For a very long time alcohol consumption has been associated with men and women alcohol addiction was automatically unheard of. Any woman indulging in drinking could then suffer serious social discrimination with a lot of stigmatization. That was then but currently things are changing with the trend indicating that many employed women are now so much into alcohol drinking. Even though things are changing now, this is only common in the developed nations with US leading. Stigma can be very demeaning and causes loss of self-esteem. This can be avoided if all factors leading to alcoholism are addressed appropriately and in good time. If therefore you are drinking, stigma or no stigma, alcohol consumption is a health hazard and the sooner a remedial action is taken the better. You can always consult with doctor Dalal Akoury who is a veteran addiction expert of several decades and she will be able to effectively and professionally help you go through your recovery program.

Women alcohol addiction and social stigma: The fading social stigma escalating addiction

Because of the women alcohol addiction and how it was being stigmatized in the past, women were not so much into drinking. During this period a lot of drug and alcohol abuse related complications were not so common with women. Men were the biggest casualties but this is now changing. Because of fading stigma young women are now binge drinking hence the increase of health complications that come with alcohol abuse. This has further been established by the research findings according to the data from a survey of some 18000 college students across US. From this study it was established that one in every three female students are seriously into binge drinking. In other words they are consuming four or more drinks in a row and in very quick succession. These are not very good statistics especially considering the serious prevalence of alcohol addiction in our societies today. And back to the study, it was also established that between the years 1993-2001, the rate of binge drinking female students were more than doubled. From the study it was further frustrating that even though male students were more dependent on alcohol, it was surprising that more than half of the women students were actually abusing alcohol.

Finally doctor Akoury registers that these trends are very disturbing, given that binge drinking not only carries health risks for both men and women but also increases the chance of unwanted and unplanned sexual activity. Because of this women risk becoming pregnant and both men and women risk contracting a sexually transmitted disease. All these can be avoided if we chose to have sobriety and not come close to the bottle. How can you do that? Take a moment and talk to doctor Dalal Akoury today and you will be free from alcoholism in a record time.

Women alcohol addiction and social stigma: The consequences of alcohol abuse

 

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Stigmatization due to overweight and obesity

Stigmatization due to overweight and obesity: The effects it has on both genders

Stigmatization due to overweight and obesity

Stigmatization due to overweight and obesity is not a fiction any more. Many obese people are suffering a lot in the hands of those who are suppose to help them like doctors, teachers, parents and employers

Overweight people are in many situations often finds themselves on the receiving end due to a range of reasons. Besides the possible health complications that come with being overweight and obese, these individuals often becomes the subject of ridicule, discrimination and other acts that can only be considered to be inhumane. It is a pity that this is happening in this twenty first century despite the public awareness that obesity and overweight are diseases like any other which needs medical attention. While attending one of the conferences organized by doctor Dalal Akoury (MD) and founder of AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center. She was very categorical that stigmatization due to overweight and obesity is becoming a global problem with US being on the list of states that leads in this uncalled for behavior. In her speech she wondered why this is happening and I believe that your conscious is not clear about the same and you are wondering too. Because of that, we are going to discuss some of the effects of this heinous behavior and also offer some working solution that we believe will be very helpful to you. We want therefore appeal to you passionately to keep reading and be the first to know the modalities of addressing such situations.

The element of stigmatization is deeply rooted in some communities to the effect that people who are struggling with excess weight or obesity are under serious pressure from their molesters and the experience of discrimination is across a wide variety of settings, including healthcare, employment, schools, public transport sector, social amenities joints and interpersonal relationships. Our children are bullied in school and their performance is deteriorating in the process. Employers are not keen on giving opportunities to obese individuals thereby causing some people their only source of livelihoods. We will look at some of these in details as we progress into the discussion and this is something you don’t want to miss. Therefore stay with us on the link and where possible invite a friend to spread the scope of our resolve to create more awareness to the public that stigmatization due to overweight and obesity is a serious crime to social justice.

Stigmatization due to overweight and obesity: Social discrimination

We have just mentioned something about job opportunities and for sure this is one area which needs to be focused on very objectively. Many employers are shying from offering job opportunities to people who are overweight for fear that they may not be active enough to deliver on their assignment. This discrimination does not stop there; even those that are already in the employment often find themselves being left out when promotion opportunities are advertised. Such opportunities are almost like a reserve to their lean colleagues. As if that is not enough some employers go further to frustrate them by low remuneration siting nonperformance and increased risk of job insecurity just because of their weight.

In healthcare settings, patients affected by obesity often experience prejudice, apathy and lower quality of care from medical professionals, which may result in patients choosing to delay or forgo crucial preventative care to avoid additional humiliation.

Students also face weight-based victimization in educational institutions from their peers, teachers and even parents, this affects the adversely in nearly all the sectors of their life including the interference with their social support and educational achievement. Besides all these it is also emerging that weight related stigma is also present in interpersonal relationships with friends, family and romantic partners, such that negative judgment invades almost all areas of the lives of people affected by obesity.

Stigmatization due to overweight and obesity: Gender differences in experiences of weight stigma

Although both men and women are vulnerable to weight discrimination, their experiences may differ with respect to how much discrimination they are exposed to and the forms that it takes. Most notably, women seem to experience higher levels of weight stigmatization than men, even at lower levels of excess weight. Research suggests that women, especially those who are middle aged or with lower levels of education, experience weight discrimination at significantly higher rates than male peers. Moreover, women report weight discrimination at lower levels of excess weight than men. For example, men tend to report considerable stigmatization at a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 35 or higher, whereas women report experiencing notable increases in weight discrimination at a lower BMI of only 27.

North American ideals of physical attractiveness, which emphasize thinness as central to feminine beauty, may account for some of these differences. Women whose bodies deviate, even slightly, from physical beauty standards may be vulnerable to weight stigmatization. Given that thinness ideals have become deeply ingrained into our society and are heavily promoted by the mass media, diet industry and fashion industry, it’s not surprising to see widespread weight stigmatization toward women, even if they are not “obese.

For women, weight discrimination has been associated with poorer body image, low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and a range of unhealthy eating behaviors, including binge eating.

Stigmatization due to overweight and obesity: Gender differences in children and adolescents

Young people are vulnerable to the negative social and emotional consequences of obesity. The magnitude of stigmatization always takes the shape of bullying and victimization which impacts adversely on their relationships, education and occasionally on their physical health. There has been an inconsistency in research findings to gender with some studies establishing that girls experience more weight-based victimization, reporting higher levels of teasing and being assigned more negative characteristics as a result of their weight than boys. Other research, however, has failed to find sex differences in vulnerabilities. It may be that differences are more apparent in the types of stigmatization experienced by boys and girls, rather than the quantity or amount of these experiences.

For instance weight-based bullying may be more predominant among boys who are affected by excess weight while girls may experience more weight-based victimization in the form of social exclusion from their peers.

As I had indicated above boys and girls who experience weight-based victimization are at increased risk for negative social and educational outcomes, however, these risks seem to be even more identical with girls who are overweight, display lower academic self-esteem and are significantly more likely to be held back a grade than boys. Girls are also more likely to experience negative psychological outcomes, like depression in response to experiences of weight victimization, and may endure more pronounced difficulties in interpersonal relationships with peers and dating partners in adolescence.

Research shows that adolescent and young adult women who are affected by excess weight have lower potential for romantic relationships compared to their non-overweight peers. However, for young men, being affected by excess weight may not be detrimental to dating and forming romantic relationships. In fact, it may even be associated with positive and desirable characteristics like strength and masculinity.

Finally the content of this article is not conclusive and certainly further studies are necessary to unlock and comprehend the nature and extent of gender differences in experiences of weight stigmatization. Even though it may appear for now that some differences may exist and more so ladies may have increased vulnerability in some areas compared to men. These are very useful tips which should be known by the various sector e.g. employers, learning institutions to help them intervene and bring this madness of weight stigmatization to a manageable levels. Doing all these may necessitate that you seek well guided professional advice from an experienced expert. These services are available at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center a facility founded by Doctor Akoury who is an expert in this line of obesity and has been helping people regain their lives back for the last two decades through a painless process by focusing on Neuroendocrine Restoration (NER) to reinstate normality through realization of the oneness of Spirit, Mind, and Body, Unifying the threesome into ONE. Calling doctor Akoury will be very helpful for you to sort out all your questions relating to weight gain and obesity in all aspect.

Stigmatization due to overweight and obesity: The effects it has on both genders

 

 

 

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Childhood Obesity Stigma

Childhood Obesity Stigma – Your Role as a Parent

Obesity

Childhood obesity stigma is not just uncalled for but very irresponsible. Obesity is a health condition like any other why stigma?

In making effort to bringing up our children in the best way we can, we are often meet with different challenges hindering our desire to do our part perfectly as we would wish to. Take for example the problem of childhood obesity stigma. This is quite an uphill task for parents who are not most of the time around their children when they are being harassed by their mates in schools or in the social media platform. Childhood obesity stigma is destroying our children causing them to feel secluded, alone and helpless. We have a duty as parents to find out if our children are being bullied in whichever way to help them maintain their self-esteem. In today’s society body weight is among the common reasons why young people are harassed and while this is taking place and our children are being bullied, victimization of overweight youth continues to be ignored by the media, research and policy discussions. Recent studies indicated that more and more student are being teased in a mean way or during the physical activity classes, called names and being made fun of because of their overweight problem.

I want to pose and ask, is overweight a health condition like any other? Why bully? The consequences of weight-based teasing and bullying are many and can be severe. Overweight youth who are teased and bullied are vulnerable to social, psychological, emotional and physical health impairments which may include:

  • Increased risk of depression and anxiety
  • Negative body image
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Avoiding gym class
  • Skipping school
  • Academic impairment
  • Unhealthy weight control
  • Binge-eating behaviors
  • Reduced physical activity
  • Increased body mass index (BMI)

There is an emerging trend of weight related victimization much less known called cyber bullying causing a lot of devastating results among young people. Let’s take a moment to discuss cyber bullying.

Childhood Obesity Stigma – Cyber-Bullying

This is the deliberate, attempt to inflict injury or discomfort of another person through electronic means. For adolescents, estimates of cyber victims range from 4-72 percent. Cyber-bullying takes a number of different forms including threats, insults, gossip, rumors, impersonation, hacking into other people’s accounts or spreading someone else’s private or personal information without consent. Peers are not the only perpetrators. In fact, youth report being bullied by adults and siblings, and 48 to 79 percent have been bullied by strangers or individuals they have never met in person.

Its anonymity sets cyber-bullying apart from more “traditional” victimization, but cyber-bullying is especially harmful because it penetrates beyond the school boundary and can possibly happens anyone at any time. The majority (85 percent) of cyber-bullying happens at home, but these experiences may also affect children at school. What may be frustrating is that often parents are largely unaware of their children’s roles as cyber-bullies or victims.

Youth who are cyber-bullied may be especially vulnerable to consequences that differ from more traditional forms of bullying. These include weapon-carrying at school, low caregiver-adolescent connectedness, headaches, sleeping difficulties, sexual solicitation, social anxiety and suicidal thoughts and behaviors. However, it is unclear if these problems instigate or result from the cyber-bullying.

Childhood Obesity Stigma – Cyber bullying and Body Weight

Up to now very little research has been done about cyber-bullying specifically toward children affected by obesity. However the high rates of youth who report witnessing and experiencing weight-based teasing, it is likely that many children affected by obesity are victims of cyber-bullying. Devastating stories of two girls who hung themselves have recently circulated in the media. Megan a 13-year-old Missouri girl who struggled with her weight, experienced cyber-bullying on MySpace and was called “fat” and “slut” by someone posing as another person. Celina, an 11-year-old Florida girl, experienced cyber-bullying via text messages from classmates who jeered at her weight and race.

Like I had said we all have a duty to care for our children and so it is important to ensure that weight-based cyber-bullying is on the radar of parents. Parents can be powerful change-agents in bringing this issue to the attention of schools, and especially to help protect their own children from becoming victims of cyber-bullying. Parents can also communicate the following messages to their children to help prevent cyber-bullying, and to react appropriately if it occurs:

Prevention

  • Never share or post your private/personal information (name, address, phone number).
  • Do not share your passwords with anyone, not even friends.
  • When you see a picture, Email or message that may be hurtful, embarrassing or cruel, delete it do not forward it.

Reaction:

  • If you are the victim of cyber-bullying, do not retaliate.
  • Record the message and details as best as you can.
  • Then, delete it, block the bully, sign-off or exit the Web site and tell an adult.

The facts
There are many opportunities for overweight youth to be cyber-bullied. Teens use the Internet and send/receive text messages significantly more than any other age group, with 93 percent using the Internet and 73 percent using social networking Web sites – most often Facebook and MySpace.

Three-fourths of teens own a cell phone, and on average, teens send/receive 2,539-4,050 texts per month. This is concerning given that the Internet and cell phones are the primary places where cyber-bullying occurs.

Childhood Obesity Stigma – Strategies for Parents

Monitoring Cyber bullies and victims spend more time on computers and report less monitoring than youth who are not involved in cyber-bullying. Regulate the time and access your child has to the Internet. Set boundaries on usage and the types of Web sites or services your child is allowed to visit.

Familiarizing Parents should try to understand cyber media and Internet safety. Share this information with your child to help them understand potential dangers.

Accountability Ask your child about Web sites, activities and communications they accesses. Set-up your own pages to understand these sites and keep your child accountable.

Communication – It is estimated nine out of 10 children do not tell their parents or an adult when something mean or hurtful happens to them online. Some youth are afraid that they will lose their Internet or phone privileges, or that the bullying will get worse. To keep the dialogue open, make sure that your child knows that you are there to help.

Education – Work with schools to provide education about privacy and safety on the Web, or media literacy programs to teach youth how to be more intelligent, critical consumers of Web-based services and information.

If your child has been a victim of cyber-bullying:

  • Comfort your child, do not blame them.
  • Record the details of the encounter.
  • Form a plan to avoid future occurrences.
  • If the problem escalates, safety is threatened, or it does not stop, legal action may be necessary.
  • Seek for help at AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center under Doctor Akoury’s care she will help you and your children the most natural way while focusing on Neuroendocrine Restoration (NER) to reinstate normality through realization of the oneness of Spirit, Mind, and Body, Unifying the threesome into ONE
Childhood Obesity Stigma – Your Role as a Parent

 

 

 

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Stigmatization of Addiction

Stigmatization of Addiction-Find out more

Stigma

Addiction is a disease like any other victims of addiction needs your support and care stop discrimination and stigma towards them.

I strongly believe that where you are in your neighborhood or in your family you have come across someone suffering from a given illness. Depending on the magnitude of the problem at hand special considerations will be taken to help ease the pain and suffering of the patient. This is normally a common and positive gesture that we extend to sick people. To be more specific let us take cancer as an example. It will not go unnoticed the great concern people will have if one of their friends or relative has been diagnosed with cancer. All the family members will express their sympathetic gasps of concern and be around the patient trying to find out the treatment options and the very detail information related to the significance of the diagnosis. Alongside all this special dedication to prayers, get well cards flowers will be sent to the patient all too express sympathy and concern.

Stigmatization of Addiction-Drug addiction

Addiction, just like cancer, is a fatal disease the only difference is how it has been stigmatized and this is a huge source of hindrance for many to understand it and give the victims the kind of support they may need.
Unfortunately addiction being a mental illness, garnering the support of others can be taxing and difficult. Majority do not understand mental illness to the degree that they understand and relate to illnesses based in physiological malfunctions. Mental illness does not come in a package seared with scars, a cast on a leg, or intravenous feeding tubes protruding from the victim’s wrists and to the nose. People suffering from this problem normally tends to be secretive and make all efforts to hide the true diagnosis from everyone and more so to their employers. Because emotions couple with mismanagement of a mental illness or lack of proper treatment put together necessitate that the patient be a way from the employment environment. In some cases, the need to be away may present itself with greater urgency than the individual’s physically ill appears due to the stigma surrounding addiction.

In recent years, negative ideas and connotations surrounding addiction have definitely improved, particularly since the earlier part of the century. Alcoholics are no longer sent off to psychiatric wards and mental institutions; a breadth of knowledge on the subject is readily available. Scientific and psychiatric communities alike recognize alcoholism as a legitimate disease. Treatment methods include regular attendance at 12-step meetings, forming a relationship with a higher power, reaching out to others in a support network, and staying active in one’s recovery. The biggest success stories boast stories of a renowned sense of spirituality. In terms of addiction, the plight is the same. Drug addicts recover from a debilitating addiction through spiritual means; by reaching out for help; and by being accountable to a group of individuals who have trudged the same road. However, knowledge based in the recovery process from both addiction and alcoholism is often limited to specialists in the relevant fields or family members of addicts and alcoholics only.
One of the barriers preventing afflicted individuals from seeking addiction treatment lies in the stigma surrounding addiction. Addiction stigma is directly correlated with the language frequently used to describe addiction-related topics. Addicts suffer from low self-esteem. They become withdrawn and isolate in their bedrooms anything to avoid being out in public or immersed in social situations. They want to stop, but find they cannot. Terminology that perpetuates the stigma of addiction only serves to intensify these deep-seated negative feelings. For example, the following list is inclusive of terminology that exacerbates an addict’s sense of guilt, shame, and isolation:

  • Calling an addict a “junkie” or an “abuser” doing so leaves no discrepancy between the human being and their disease; implies a lack of will power or character.
  • Drug Abuse in general, addicts abuse drugs; but using the term “abuse” can have long-term negative effects, due to the connotation of the term. It attributes the disease of addiction solely to the individual, ignoring environmental and genetic predispositions.
  • Referring to an addict’s test results as “dirty” causes the addict to feel filthy; unclean; undeserving of love and support.
  • Claiming that an addict “has a drug habit” doing so evades the medical assessment of addiction; negates the fact that addiction is characterized by a physical allergen, a mental preoccupation, and a spiritual sickness.
  • Labeling an addict a “user” leaves the addict feeling shameful, alone and a supposed drain on society’s resources; can also be misleading due to its part in describing individuals who have experimented with drugs but not necessarily suffered from a full-blown addiction.
  • Over time, we encourage the general public to conduct further research on the disease of addiction. Through increased access to addiction information, and factual awareness on the subject, individuals will learn to replace terms like “junkie” in describing an addict seeking recovery services with “a patient undergoing treatment for a substance misuse disorder”.

Stigmatization of Addiction-Media influence

The media is not doing much to help solve the problem of addiction stigmatization either. Today nearly all the different forms of media outlets are full of negativities in relation to addiction, the kind of movies, television shows etc. does not highlight the effects of addiction in a dignified way as they do to other illnesses like cancer which we looked earlier. This is one campaign that the civil society and all likeminded people should involve in to bring about the much needed change of attitude towards addiction as a disease.

Learning institutions is another avenue which can be very helpful in the fight against stigma and to recognize addiction as a serious disease of which like any other disease needs professional care and treatment. This can be done by incorporating the use of non-stigmatizing terms such as:

  • Harmful use of drugs and not “reckless use of drugs”
  • Hazardous drug use
  • Risky drug use
  • Substance free rather than “dirty” when referring to drug-free screening results
  • Replacing “user” with “person involved in risky substance used”
  • Medically monitored treatment regimen as an alternative to the term “substitution therapy” which refers to the addicts receiving counter-indicative drugs throughout the detoxification process; inaccurately describes addicts prescribed antidepressants in early sobriety
  • Instead of “drug habit” use terms such as “an individual engaged in active addiction”, or an individual suffering from “a substance misuse disorder”

In all this experiences we as a society have a duty to offer care and support to those suffering from addiction. In bid to offer the much needed care and support doctor Akoury founded AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center a facility which is fully dedicated on offering solution while focusing on Neuroendocrine Restoration (NER) to reinstate normality through realization of the oneness of Spirit, Mind, and Body, Unifying the threesome into ONE. These are the kind of people we need to fight and eradicate stigma completely. If you ask me to recommend for you someone with great experience on addiction and much more I would not hesitate to recommend doctor Dalal Akoury, oh wait a minute I just did. Go for it friend and live your life to the fullest.

Stigmatization of Addiction-Find out more

 

 

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