Tag Archives: Terminating addiction stigmatization

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Stigmatizing obese people

Stigmatizing obese people

Stigmatizing obese people is a tool that derails weight loss progress and must be discouraged

Stigmatizing obese people: How it affects both men and women

It is regrettable that at this point in time people are still living under certain siege of discrimination because of avoidable health conditions like overweight and obesity. Discriminating or stigmatizing obese people is a common illegality the world over with the US taking lead. I will be discussing some effects of this habit and offer solutions so that you can live your life freely by avoiding being discriminated upon. According to the experts from the AWAREmed health and wellness resource center under the leadership of Doctor Dalal Akoury MD, people who are affected by excess weight or obesity experience discrimination across a wide variety of settings, including healthcare, employment, schools, public transport sector, social amenities joints and interpersonal relationships.

Stigmatizing obese people: Social discrimination

Let us consider the employment settings, job seekers who are affected by excess weight are often less likely to secure job opportunities or even be recommended for promotion compared to their slimmer colleagues and in the very extreme they are also faced with lower remunerations and increased risk of job insecurity based on their weight alone.

In healthcare settings, obese patients often experience prejudice, apathy and lower quality of care from medical professionals, which may result in patients choosing to delay or forgo crucial preventative care to avoid additional humiliation.

Students also face weight-based victimization in the educational sector from their peers, teachers and even parents, which may interfere with social support and educational achievement.

Weight stigma is even present in interpersonal relationships with friends, family and romantic partners, such that negative judgment invades almost all areas of the lives of people affected by obesity.

Stigmatizing obese people: Gender differences in weight gain stigma

Although both men and women are vulnerable to weight discrimination, their experiences may differ with respect to how much discrimination they are exposed to and the forms that it takes. Most notably, women seem to experience higher levels of weight stigmatization than men, even at lower levels of excess weight. Research suggests that women, especially those who are middle-aged or with lower levels of education, experience weight discrimination at significantly higher rates than male peers. Moreover, women report weight discrimination at lower levels of excess weight than men. For example, men tend to report considerable stigmatization at a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 35 or higher, whereas women report experiencing notable increases in weight discrimination at a lower BMI of only 27.

North American ideals of physical attractiveness, which emphasize thinness as central to feminine beauty, may account for some of these differences. Women whose bodies deviate, even slightly, from physical beauty standards may be vulnerable to weight stigmatization. Given that thinness ideals have become deeply ingrained into our society and are heavily promoted by the mass media, diet industry and fashion industry, it’s not surprising to see widespread weight stigmatization toward women, even if they are not “obese.” For women, weight discrimination has been associated with poorer body image, low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and a range of unhealthy eating behaviors, including binge eating. We must get out of this madness and schedule an appointment with AWAREmed health center should be the starting point to getting a leaner body weight.

Stigmatizing obese people: How it affects both men and women

 

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drug abuse

Stigmatizing addiction patients

Stigmatizing addiction patients

Stigmatizing addiction patients in anyway is wrong and doesn’t help but kills the morale of those who help the most

Stigmatizing addiction patients: Addiction is a disease of free will

Over the last few decades of my practice as a medical professional, I have met patients globally with different disturbing health conditions coming to my office for treatment which we have gladly offered to a resounding positive feedback. We have made it a routine as experts from AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center to give our very best to all our clients irrespective of their limitations. We believe in offering lasting solutions to all health complications that we can professionally handle. This has made us move from strength to strength over the years. However, one problem of drug addiction keeps recurring owing to the nature of its effects to people differently. This one story disturbs me the most because it came to my attention several years after I was first introduced to the couple. That story is going to form part of our discussion even as we focus on stigmatizing addiction patients both internally and externally.

Drug addiction is a medical problem and has nothing to do with one’s morals. It is painful seeing patients giving up on treatment because they keep relapsing every time they are about to have a breakthrough. We are taking seriously the issue of relapse so that we can be in the front lane in defeating the beast of addiction. If you know anyone struggling with any kind of addiction, our doors are always open for you and you can call Doctor Dalal Akoury to help you recover professionally and with dignity.

Stigmatizing addiction patients: Stop the humiliation and disgrace

Back to the story, three decades ago a couple visited my office with an addiction problem. The man who was alcoholic was in the company of his wife to seek help. Before we could even start the session, they excused themselves shortly and I felt that they were consulting on something before the session. I was surprised several minutes and hours later that my client vanished never to return. Several years later one of my students narrated this story to me and I was astonished. The student said, “when I was five or six years old, my maternal grandfather died of what I was told was complications of heart disease.” She believed that because that is what she was told. It was not until several years later, after she had graduated from a medical school in psychiatry, and had secured a job for a very long time using neuroimaging to study the addicted brain, that she learned the real reason for the death of her grandfather. One day her mother gave her the revelation that shocked her life. This was coming when her mother was sick and almost breathing her last, “I need to tell you something I have never spoken to you about.” She disclosed to her that her grandfather had been an alcoholic and that he took his own life in his distress at not being able to control his strong urges to drink.

“Oh, Jesus I almost lost my grip.” Her mother had out of fear of stigma and shame kept the real reason for her grandfather’s death a secret from her that long. What surprised her is that even though she knew that in her whole professional life was devoted to trying to understand what drugs do to the brain and that she had heard her speak of addiction as a disease of the brain, still she was not going to tell her the whole truth.” So she wondered how she had miscommunicated, and how she had not made her realize that it was not a taboo to speak about addiction and that there should be no shame in it. This really troubled her and so she came to confide in me. Stop stigmatizing patients and let’s support them get better.

Stigmatizing addiction patients: Addiction is a disease of free will

 

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Misuse of alcohol

Terminating addiction stigmatization

Terminating addiction stigmatization

Terminating addiction stigmatization of any kind is important as it will help victims come out for help freely

Terminating addiction stigmatization: Is addiction a brain disease?

Is addiction a brain disease? Ideally, in addition, there is nothing like the physiological malfunction. Addiction may be defined in many different ways, however, for the purpose of this article, addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite the harmful consequences. Addiction is seen as a brain disease simply because drugs has the power of making changes in the brain. These change then alters the brain’s structure and how it works. When this happens users may develop certain characters and behaviors that are likely to be viewed negatively in the community. It is this negativity that makes observers within the community to start isolation and pointing fingers. That is why we want to create awareness on eradication and terminating addiction stigmatization to give the treatment a chance says doctor Dalal Akoury MD and also the founder of AWAREmed Health and Wellness Resource Center.

Terminating addiction stigmatization: Dopamine

All drugs of abuse, whether legal or illegal, cause large surges of dopamine in brain areas crucial for motivating our behavior—both the reward regions (such as the nucleus accumbens) as well as prefrontal regions that control our higher functions like judgment, decision making, and self-control over our actions. These brain circuits adapt to these surges by becoming much less sensitive to dopamine, a process called receptor downregulation. The result is that ordinary healthy things in our lives like all the pleasurable social and physical behaviors necessary for our survival (which are rewarded by small bursts of dopamine throughout the day) no longer are enough to motivate a person; the person will, therefore, need a big surge of dopamine from the drug just to feel temporarily okay and they must continually repeat this, in an endless vicious cycle.

Terminating addiction stigmatization: Addiction and Suicide

Finally, addiction and suicide are closely linked together and if you followed our last posting about the story of this grandfather who committed suicide because he could not control his drinking problem and the daughter who could also not share about the actual cause of his death freely because of shame and stigma, then you will notice that the shame was not just because the father had been an alcoholic, but because he committed suicide, out of hopelessness and helplessness at his inability to control the strong urges to drink. We all have a duty to play in stopping addiction stigmatization so that patients can seek treatment freely. It pains very painful that something that could be treated caused this great damage simply because of stigma, shame, and fear. Dear reader if you’re following this story, let this be the last one, addiction is a treatable condition and stigma or shame are just perceptions that should not result in death. Come quickly for help today and together let’s kick out of our lives the problem of drug addiction.

Terminating addiction stigmatization: Is addiction a brain disease?

 

 

 

 

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